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  #1  
Old January 27th 04, 09:15 PM
jaycb74
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default 180s

So I've been messing with these lately and just looking for some advice.

I use to always take-off fakie and land regular i.e. I would land in my
regular riding style. I got pretty comfortable with this but the only
problem is that it is tough to sometimes hit the transition right when
riding fakie. Now I'm trying to take-off regular and land fakie but for
some reason have this fear of my front knee buckling the wrong way when
landing, I guess because its just totally opposite on how I would normally
land a jump. Everyone I've talked to says this really isn't an injury they
are aware of for this move but wanted to see if anyone had any tricks to
pull these off?

Thanks.


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  #2  
Old January 28th 04, 06:36 AM
Arvin Chang
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default 180s

"jaycb74" wrote in message news:[email protected]
So I've been messing with these lately and just looking for some advice.

I use to always take-off fakie and land regular i.e. I would land in my
regular riding style. I got pretty comfortable with this but the only
problem is that it is tough to sometimes hit the transition right when
riding fakie. Now I'm trying to take-off regular and land fakie but for
some reason have this fear of my front knee buckling the wrong way when
landing, I guess because its just totally opposite on how I would normally
land a jump. Everyone I've talked to says this really isn't an injury they
are aware of for this move but wanted to see if anyone had any tricks to
pull these off?

Thanks.


If you did a 180 and landed fakie and leaned too far over your tail
(forward) you would risk injurying your ACL (eep!). That being said,
it basically never happens unless you really overshoot the landing and
land in the flat. However, since I already have a sprained ACL, I'm
avoiding it.

Which way are you spinning. I'm guessing frontside since backside
requires you to land blind (i.e. looking up the uphill and not where
you are going). I think the main important things a

1. Lean forward as you enter the air. Pretty much everyone
unconsciously leans back on a jump when they are nervous. By forcing
yourself to lean forward and shift more weight to the front foot, you
are actually compensating for this and will probably be more or less
centered. Not to take this to extremes, but you pretty much *can't*
lean too far forward, becaues you mind won't let you do it. To your
subconscious mind, the edge of the jump is like the edge of a cliff
and so you mentally aren't capable of realistically leaning too far
forward. So basically try to lean as far forward as you can... more
than you think is necessary. A side corollary, always go a little
faster than you think you need to. A little too far is a lot better
than a little too short on a jump.

2. *Bend* your knees. Similarly, people like stand up straight and
tall when they are out of their comfort zone. You will see novice
jumper straight leg they jumps and not absorb the the landing as the
shock jolts through their locked knees. Approach the jump with you
needs bent, you will feel like you want to stand up and look over the
jump, resist this urge. When you enter the air, pull your knees *up*
and THEN extend then halfway down again for the landing.

3. Go faster than you think you need to. Again like tip #1, someone is
going to take this too far and yell at me (use your common sense). My
observation whenever you try something new (at any level, whether it's
your first jump, first 180, 360, inverted air) you automatically feel
uncomfortable with speed and slow down (do an extra speed check or
two) too much. Ironically this *dramatically* increases your chances
of crashing as you will land short in the transition and that extra
jolt makes it much harder to land. Mentally force yourself to go
faster and do *not* change your mind at the last second and slow down,
that is just wrong and most likely will lead to you crashing. The
normal setup is to take 2-3 turns before the jump, *stop* turning and
just go straight the last 10-15 feet before the jump. This is last bit
is key for virtually all jumps... landing on the landing part of the
tabletop, while farther away, is *much* easier than going short and
landing in the flat transition. When you land on the landing, it's
like you never left the ground it's so smooth, when you land on the
transition, even if you were perfect on your takeoff, you might crash
due to the jolt of the landing.

If you are too afraid, or mentally unable to do this yet. Don't worry,
it's ok that's you natural sense of self-preservation acting. Try
starting on a smaller jump or put yourself on a steep blue/black and
try to get some air off a roller while going *fast* because that speed
is critical. Don't try to do a jump that's obviously beyond you skill
level (use common sense). If you can't do a black/blue run yet, don't
even bother going into the park, you will merely endanger yourself and
aggravate others.

If you want to do backside 180s, I can give you some tips on that (but
all the above still applies).

--Arvin
  #3  
Old January 28th 04, 09:40 AM
Barney
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default 180s


"Arvin Chang" wrote in message
om...
"jaycb74" wrote in message

news:[email protected]
So I've been messing with these lately and just looking for some advice.

I use to always take-off fakie and land regular i.e. I would land in my
regular riding style. I got pretty comfortable with this but the only
problem is that it is tough to sometimes hit the transition right when
riding fakie. Now I'm trying to take-off regular and land fakie but for
some reason have this fear of my front knee buckling the wrong way when
landing, I guess because its just totally opposite on how I would

normally
land a jump. Everyone I've talked to says this really isn't an injury

they
are aware of for this move but wanted to see if anyone had any tricks to
pull these off?

Thanks.


If you did a 180 and landed fakie and leaned too far over your tail
(forward) you would risk injurying your ACL (eep!). That being said,
it basically never happens unless you really overshoot the landing and
land in the flat. However, since I already have a sprained ACL, I'm
avoiding it.

Which way are you spinning. I'm guessing frontside since backside
requires you to land blind (i.e. looking up the uphill and not where
you are going). I think the main important things a

1. Lean forward as you enter the air. Pretty much everyone
unconsciously leans back on a jump when they are nervous. By forcing
yourself to lean forward and shift more weight to the front foot, you
are actually compensating for this and will probably be more or less
centered. Not to take this to extremes, but you pretty much *can't*
lean too far forward, becaues you mind won't let you do it. To your
subconscious mind, the edge of the jump is like the edge of a cliff
and so you mentally aren't capable of realistically leaning too far
forward. So basically try to lean as far forward as you can... more
than you think is necessary. A side corollary, always go a little
faster than you think you need to. A little too far is a lot better
than a little too short on a jump.

2. *Bend* your knees. Similarly, people like stand up straight and
tall when they are out of their comfort zone. You will see novice
jumper straight leg they jumps and not absorb the the landing as the
shock jolts through their locked knees. Approach the jump with you
needs bent, you will feel like you want to stand up and look over the
jump, resist this urge. When you enter the air, pull your knees *up*
and THEN extend then halfway down again for the landing.

3. Go faster than you think you need to. Again like tip #1, someone is
going to take this too far and yell at me (use your common sense). My
observation whenever you try something new (at any level, whether it's
your first jump, first 180, 360, inverted air) you automatically feel
uncomfortable with speed and slow down (do an extra speed check or
two) too much. Ironically this *dramatically* increases your chances
of crashing as you will land short in the transition and that extra
jolt makes it much harder to land. Mentally force yourself to go
faster and do *not* change your mind at the last second and slow down,
that is just wrong and most likely will lead to you crashing. The
normal setup is to take 2-3 turns before the jump, *stop* turning and
just go straight the last 10-15 feet before the jump. This is last bit
is key for virtually all jumps... landing on the landing part of the
tabletop, while farther away, is *much* easier than going short and
landing in the flat transition. When you land on the landing, it's
like you never left the ground it's so smooth, when you land on the
transition, even if you were perfect on your takeoff, you might crash
due to the jolt of the landing.

If you are too afraid, or mentally unable to do this yet. Don't worry,
it's ok that's you natural sense of self-preservation acting. Try
starting on a smaller jump or put yourself on a steep blue/black and
try to get some air off a roller while going *fast* because that speed
is critical. Don't try to do a jump that's obviously beyond you skill
level (use common sense). If you can't do a black/blue run yet, don't
even bother going into the park, you will merely endanger yourself and
aggravate others.

If you want to do backside 180s, I can give you some tips on that (but
all the above still applies).


Hmmm, food for thought. I managed to do my first jump a couple of weeks ago
at the Lecht here in Scotland. It was a kicker about 18 inches high (45cm or
so), so no big deal, but I kept bottling it and riding past it. Eventually I
flatlined at it, I didn't bottle it, and it was fine. I'm looking forward to
trying some more at Cairn Gorm this weekend!


  #4  
Old January 28th 04, 11:06 AM
copek
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default 180s

tips on backside 180s sound good please!!

"Arvin Chang" wrote in message
om...
"jaycb74" wrote in message

news:[email protected]
So I've been messing with these lately and just looking for some advice.

I use to always take-off fakie and land regular i.e. I would land in my
regular riding style. I got pretty comfortable with this but the only
problem is that it is tough to sometimes hit the transition right when
riding fakie. Now I'm trying to take-off regular and land fakie but for
some reason have this fear of my front knee buckling the wrong way when
landing, I guess because its just totally opposite on how I would

normally
land a jump. Everyone I've talked to says this really isn't an injury

they
are aware of for this move but wanted to see if anyone had any tricks to
pull these off?

Thanks.


If you did a 180 and landed fakie and leaned too far over your tail
(forward) you would risk injurying your ACL (eep!). That being said,
it basically never happens unless you really overshoot the landing and
land in the flat. However, since I already have a sprained ACL, I'm
avoiding it.

Which way are you spinning. I'm guessing frontside since backside
requires you to land blind (i.e. looking up the uphill and not where
you are going). I think the main important things a

1. Lean forward as you enter the air. Pretty much everyone
unconsciously leans back on a jump when they are nervous. By forcing
yourself to lean forward and shift more weight to the front foot, you
are actually compensating for this and will probably be more or less
centered. Not to take this to extremes, but you pretty much *can't*
lean too far forward, becaues you mind won't let you do it. To your
subconscious mind, the edge of the jump is like the edge of a cliff
and so you mentally aren't capable of realistically leaning too far
forward. So basically try to lean as far forward as you can... more
than you think is necessary. A side corollary, always go a little
faster than you think you need to. A little too far is a lot better
than a little too short on a jump.

2. *Bend* your knees. Similarly, people like stand up straight and
tall when they are out of their comfort zone. You will see novice
jumper straight leg they jumps and not absorb the the landing as the
shock jolts through their locked knees. Approach the jump with you
needs bent, you will feel like you want to stand up and look over the
jump, resist this urge. When you enter the air, pull your knees *up*
and THEN extend then halfway down again for the landing.

3. Go faster than you think you need to. Again like tip #1, someone is
going to take this too far and yell at me (use your common sense). My
observation whenever you try something new (at any level, whether it's
your first jump, first 180, 360, inverted air) you automatically feel
uncomfortable with speed and slow down (do an extra speed check or
two) too much. Ironically this *dramatically* increases your chances
of crashing as you will land short in the transition and that extra
jolt makes it much harder to land. Mentally force yourself to go
faster and do *not* change your mind at the last second and slow down,
that is just wrong and most likely will lead to you crashing. The
normal setup is to take 2-3 turns before the jump, *stop* turning and
just go straight the last 10-15 feet before the jump. This is last bit
is key for virtually all jumps... landing on the landing part of the
tabletop, while farther away, is *much* easier than going short and
landing in the flat transition. When you land on the landing, it's
like you never left the ground it's so smooth, when you land on the
transition, even if you were perfect on your takeoff, you might crash
due to the jolt of the landing.

If you are too afraid, or mentally unable to do this yet. Don't worry,
it's ok that's you natural sense of self-preservation acting. Try
starting on a smaller jump or put yourself on a steep blue/black and
try to get some air off a roller while going *fast* because that speed
is critical. Don't try to do a jump that's obviously beyond you skill
level (use common sense). If you can't do a black/blue run yet, don't
even bother going into the park, you will merely endanger yourself and
aggravate others.

If you want to do backside 180s, I can give you some tips on that (but
all the above still applies).

--Arvin



  #5  
Old January 28th 04, 09:04 PM
Arvin Chang
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default 180s

As said before, you need have confidance in all separate parts of the
jump before putting it altogether. Skills you should have beforehand

1. You need to be comfortable riding fakie/switch at decently high for
more than 3-4 seconds. This is key for you to stick your landing,
because a lot of people try to switch back to regular riding
immediately (or even before) thy land and not only is that poor style,
but it can lead to a crash. Actually it's probably only 1-2 seconds,
but everyone's perspective of time, speed, and height is warped when
they are doing a jump (1 second seems like 5 seconds, 20 mph seems
liked mach 2, 2 feet seems like 10 feet). So let's just say you need
to be able to ride faster and straight (no panic skids or stops) for a
good 30-50 feet.

2. Also you need to be able to ride switch "blind" for a few seconds.
This means you are *not* looking downhill when you land (mentally
visualize the slope in your mind). From my perspective, this is key to
landing any off-number spin, because if you look down the hill while
landing fakie, you turn your shoulders, your shoulders a bit twist
pressure on your hips, and this will cause you to keep rotating (even
after you land) and you'll end up doing a 270 instead of a 180.

Any "twist" in your shoulders and hips will translate into a rotation,
if you want to keep rotating, keep them going, if not, let them relax
and untwist and you will stop rotating (so some people crash on 360s
because they stop twisting their shoulders around halfway through the
spin... and never complete the 360). Leading with your shoulders (keep
them turning) and spotting your landing is key for a 360, but is bad
for a 180.

So, no looking until you are on the ground, then you can turn you
shoulders around. The key thing is to land, ride... and *then* look
around. Once you are on the ground and riding away, you will be able
to turn your head and look forward without spinning your board around
involuntarily.

So that's general things you should be able to do. You should be able
to visualize yourself going the 180, if you can't mentally visual it,
you won't do it. Practice it on your feet, jogging, doing a backside
180 *while* mentally focusing on the terain and surrounding ahead of
you (even though you are facing away).

Because you are rotating so little, it is really hard to judge the
needed rotation speed to do a smooth 180 spin - you tend to under or
overestimate, and once you are in the spin, it's so short you can't
really adjust midair.

So instead of that, I do something that I'm not sure is "standard." I
like to cork my shoulder a little bit on the approach, 90 in the air,
and then uncork my shoulders to get the remaining 90 degree in. This
easily allows me to adjust my last few degrees... and it looks really
cool because your rotation stalls at 90 degrees when you do your grab,
and then you finsih you last 90 degree with a late rotation. So this
is what my friend Blake taught me a few years back, and I found it
effective.

You can practice this without jumping (actually I suggest you practice
it, because it will help train you to avoid catching your edges). Go
down a slope for like 5 feet and half twist you shoulders in the
direction of rotation while still riding straight. Then without
counter-rotating (i.e. twisting your hips and shoulders in opposite
direction) slowly spin 90 degree like a skidding toeside turn, then
untwist your shoulders and look up the hill (oppo and you should see
you hips will not "counter-rotate" and you board will swing the
remaining 90 degrees, ride for a full second (count to one one
thousand) this part is a little tough (riding blind) but it's key, and
then finally turn your head and shoulder to look down the hill without
turning your board.

Again... this is just what I do and what I recommend, it isn't the
final say on doing a 180. Despite my opinion, this may or may not be
the best way for a beginner to learn, but I think it is very helpful
and more importantly.. it is a method that works for bigger and more
advanced jumps (just watch more experience riders spin and see how
they land fakie... they always land blind) and so you don't pick up
any bad habits from "intro" techniques.

--Arvin


"copek" wrote in message ...
tips on backside 180s sound good please!!

"Arvin Chang" wrote in message
om...
"jaycb74" wrote in message

news:[email protected]
So I've been messing with these lately and just looking for some advice.

I use to always take-off fakie and land regular i.e. I would land in my
regular riding style. I got pretty comfortable with this but the only
problem is that it is tough to sometimes hit the transition right when
riding fakie. Now I'm trying to take-off regular and land fakie but for
some reason have this fear of my front knee buckling the wrong way when
landing, I guess because its just totally opposite on how I would

normally
land a jump. Everyone I've talked to says this really isn't an injury

they
are aware of for this move but wanted to see if anyone had any tricks to
pull these off?

Thanks.


If you did a 180 and landed fakie and leaned too far over your tail
(forward) you would risk injurying your ACL (eep!). That being said,
it basically never happens unless you really overshoot the landing and
land in the flat. However, since I already have a sprained ACL, I'm
avoiding it.

Which way are you spinning. I'm guessing frontside since backside
requires you to land blind (i.e. looking up the uphill and not where
you are going). I think the main important things a

1. Lean forward as you enter the air. Pretty much everyone
unconsciously leans back on a jump when they are nervous. By forcing
yourself to lean forward and shift more weight to the front foot, you
are actually compensating for this and will probably be more or less
centered. Not to take this to extremes, but you pretty much *can't*
lean too far forward, becaues you mind won't let you do it. To your
subconscious mind, the edge of the jump is like the edge of a cliff
and so you mentally aren't capable of realistically leaning too far
forward. So basically try to lean as far forward as you can... more
than you think is necessary. A side corollary, always go a little
faster than you think you need to. A little too far is a lot better
than a little too short on a jump.

2. *Bend* your knees. Similarly, people like stand up straight and
tall when they are out of their comfort zone. You will see novice
jumper straight leg they jumps and not absorb the the landing as the
shock jolts through their locked knees. Approach the jump with you
needs bent, you will feel like you want to stand up and look over the
jump, resist this urge. When you enter the air, pull your knees *up*
and THEN extend then halfway down again for the landing.

3. Go faster than you think you need to. Again like tip #1, someone is
going to take this too far and yell at me (use your common sense). My
observation whenever you try something new (at any level, whether it's
your first jump, first 180, 360, inverted air) you automatically feel
uncomfortable with speed and slow down (do an extra speed check or
two) too much. Ironically this *dramatically* increases your chances
of crashing as you will land short in the transition and that extra
jolt makes it much harder to land. Mentally force yourself to go
faster and do *not* change your mind at the last second and slow down,
that is just wrong and most likely will lead to you crashing. The
normal setup is to take 2-3 turns before the jump, *stop* turning and
just go straight the last 10-15 feet before the jump. This is last bit
is key for virtually all jumps... landing on the landing part of the
tabletop, while farther away, is *much* easier than going short and
landing in the flat transition. When you land on the landing, it's
like you never left the ground it's so smooth, when you land on the
transition, even if you were perfect on your takeoff, you might crash
due to the jolt of the landing.

If you are too afraid, or mentally unable to do this yet. Don't worry,
it's ok that's you natural sense of self-preservation acting. Try
starting on a smaller jump or put yourself on a steep blue/black and
try to get some air off a roller while going *fast* because that speed
is critical. Don't try to do a jump that's obviously beyond you skill
level (use common sense). If you can't do a black/blue run yet, don't
even bother going into the park, you will merely endanger yourself and
aggravate others.

If you want to do backside 180s, I can give you some tips on that (but
all the above still applies).

--Arvin

  #6  
Old January 29th 04, 06:38 AM
Jason Watkins
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default 180s

You can practice this without jumping (actually I suggest you practice
it, because it will help train you to avoid catching your edges). Go
down a slope for like 5 feet and half twist you shoulders in the
direction of rotation while still riding straight. Then without
counter-rotating (i.e. twisting your hips and shoulders in opposite
direction) slowly spin 90 degree like a skidding toeside turn, then
untwist your shoulders and look up the hill (oppo and you should see
you hips will not "counter-rotate" and you board will swing the
remaining 90 degrees, ride for a full second (count to one one
thousand) this part is a little tough (riding blind) but it's key, and
then finally turn your head and shoulder to look down the hill without
turning your board.


Ok, can you go through this again, I'm having a really hard time
visualizing it and it sounds damn interesting.

PS, saw a picture you posted over on the catek forums... that looks
like timberline in the summer. Did you do the high cascade camp or
windells or something? Whoever that is in the picture, they look ready
for the cover of transworld. If that's you, damn you know what you're
talking about.
  #7  
Old January 29th 04, 06:44 PM
Arvin Chang
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default 180s

(Jason Watkins) wrote in message . com...
You can practice this without jumping (actually I suggest you practice
it, because it will help train you to avoid catching your edges). Go
down a slope for like 5 feet and half twist you shoulders in the
direction of rotation while still riding straight. Then without
counter-rotating (i.e. twisting your hips and shoulders in opposite
direction) slowly spin 90 degree like a skidding toeside turn, then
untwist your shoulders and look up the hill (oppo and you should see
you hips will not "counter-rotate" and you board will swing the
remaining 90 degrees, ride for a full second (count to one one
thousand) this part is a little tough (riding blind) but it's key, and
then finally turn your head and shoulder to look down the hill without
turning your board.


Ok, can you go through this again, I'm having a really hard time
visualizing it and it sounds damn interesting.

PS, saw a picture you posted over on the catek forums... that looks
like timberline in the summer. Did you do the high cascade camp or
windells or something? Whoever that is in the picture, they look ready
for the cover of transworld. If that's you, damn you know what you're
talking about.


Heh, that is actually my friend Blake, the person who taught me this
180 technique (and pretty much everything else I know). I have some
photos of myself and they aren't quite as impressive as Blake is an
awesome rider (plus unlike Blake, I was lacking such a good
photographer =]) I believe this photo was taken at Killington, VT in
mid/late April. I have been to High Cascade at Timberline for a few
summers. Blake actually worked for High Cascade (again he was the one
who told me about it).

About the technique. The idea for a 180 (only 180 and 180 only!!! this
will not work for a 360... well 540, but let's not go there yet) is
that you will "counter-rotate" the last 90.

Counter-rotation is when you twist you shoulders one way and swing you
legs in the opposite rotation. You can see this affect sitting on a
rotating chair (office fun!). Squat on your chair seat and fully
extend your arms to the right (from the center of your body so you
don't start rotating yet), now rotate your arms and shoulders to the
left and your legs should rotate the in opposite direction (fun, eh?).
Notice you can rotate your legs about 90 degree from their original
position. Note that for pretty much everything else, counter-rotation
is a bad thing, since most of the time you want your body to move as a
single unit (like in the other part).

Ok, you see now how you can get the last 90 degree of board rotation
in. Now let's work backwards in time, to make that last 90 degree turn
work, you need to already be rotated 90 degrees, hence you need to
rotate 90 degree without moving your arm/shoulders since you are
already "corked" for you 90 degree counter rotation). So from your
legs and hip only you need to ollie and hop 90 degrees. Basically you
need to do a tiny bit of toeside turning as you leave the left to
impart that little but of net rotation on your in the air.

To practice this, you basically just want to do one quarter of a
flatland 360. I'm sure you've done them before, but in case you
haven't a flatland 360 is just then you slide your board around in a
circle, doing a 360 on the ground. It is very good to help you
visualize spins and get a sense of your edges (although in the
beginning, be prepared to catch an edge or two because you misjudged
when to switch edges).

So anyways, just drift on your toeside until your board has rotated
from point straight down the fall line, to perpendicular to the fall
line. That should be simple, now do that same thing with your arm
twisted/cork to your right and after you do the 90s, untwisted you
shoulders and your board should swing the final 90 degrees. Again, be
*careful* not to catch your edge as that is a high risk if you aren't
paying attention.

Does that help?
--Arvin
  #8  
Old February 2nd 04, 02:52 PM
Drug Buddy
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default 180s

Barney wrote:

Hmmm, food for thought. I managed to do my first jump a couple of
weeks ago at the Lecht here in Scotland. It was a kicker about 18
inches high (45cm or so), so no big deal, but I kept bottling it and
riding past it. Eventually I flatlined at it, I didn't bottle it, and
it was fine. I'm looking forward to trying some more at Cairn Gorm
this weekend!


Nice one Barn, I was up at Coe on Sat there, more to give a bit of support
to keeping the lifts open than anything else. Total whiteout though, spent
most of the day trying to figure out what way was up, I even got lost at one
point and had to walk til I saw a lift! BTW - whiteout conditions make you
sea sick!

Any idea how the Lecht's looking for this week, I'm hoping to catch some
more white before I return to hell.

DB


  #9  
Old February 3rd 04, 01:11 PM
Barney
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default 180s


"Drug Buddy" wrote in message
...
Barney wrote:

Hmmm, food for thought. I managed to do my first jump a couple of
weeks ago at the Lecht here in Scotland. It was a kicker about 18
inches high (45cm or so), so no big deal, but I kept bottling it and
riding past it. Eventually I flatlined at it, I didn't bottle it, and
it was fine. I'm looking forward to trying some more at Cairn Gorm
this weekend!


Nice one Barn,


Cheers. I managed to do a "proper" kicker at Cairn Gorm on Saturday. It was
built at the end of a wee ridge, so there was maybe a three foot drop (yeah,
I know, that's not really very big) in total.

I was up at Coe on Sat there, more to give a bit of support
to keeping the lifts open than anything else. Total whiteout though, spent
most of the day trying to figure out what way was up, I even got lost at

one
point and had to walk til I saw a lift! BTW - whiteout conditions make you
sea sick!


Yeah, the top of Cairn Gorm was nasty as hell. High winds, ice, whiteout.
It's a shame cos there was some lovely powder up there as well. Lower down
was much nicer, if you could avoid the rocks. And heather.

Any idea how the Lecht's looking for this week, I'm hoping to catch some
more white before I return to hell.


Is that you back to Baku? I think the snow's all melting at the moment. Not
that I care - I'm off to Tignes on Saturday for a week!


  #10  
Old February 4th 04, 08:32 PM
Tom
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Default 180s


"Arvin Chang" a écrit dans le message de
om...


About the technique. The idea for a 180 (only 180 and 180 only!!! this
will not work for a 360... well 540, but let's not go there yet) is
that you will "counter-rotate" the last 90.



Thanks... really helpfull
However, I think I'm quite confortable doing backside 180s
but i don't do this "counter rotation" stuff.
What i do is just be slighly on the toe side just before
jumping, and then i will turn slowly in the air (the visual
feedback is the ground above me) and then, as you said
landing blind in order not to keep on turning after landing.

Counter-rotate is maybe needed for "late 180s" ??

By the way, do you have any tips for 360s ??
backside i don't turn enough (most of the time i
land between 270 and 360) and frontside I keep
on turning after landing (i guess that the trick is
as for bs180 to avoid looking down just after landing).

Thanks (and sorry for the bad english)

T.




 




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