A Snow and ski forum. SkiBanter

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » SkiBanter forum » Skiing Newsgroups » Snowboarding
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

Stuck in a Rut



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old February 25th 05, 07:07 PM
Eric
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Stuck in a Rut

Well, I seem to be stuck in a rut, and I'm hoping to draw on the
experience of others in this group. This is my second season
snowboarding, and I don't really know where I'm at with my riding right
now.

I don't know what *level* I'm at--advanced beginner, maybe? I mostly
ride in Southern Colorado where there's pretty much always good
snow--powder, or a few inches of soft choppy stuff (what is that?), and
always good snow in the trees. I don't particularly enjoy the bigger
resorts in Summit County, due to all of the people-traffic and lines.
I primarily enjoy Blue or Blue/Black runs without either no moguls or
at least spread out, low profile bumps. I like to go fast, and I think
I can carve a decent line (my tracks are definitive, S-shape and thin).
I try keep my side-slipping to a minimum, and only when I need to
scrub speed. I enjoy riding through sparsely populated tree areas.
I'm not good at moguls or real tree runs--I'm a thin guy (6'1", 160
lbs) with a stiff, wide board. I've been hitting straight jumps and
rails the terrain park, but I enjoy finding kickers along/amongst the
trees a little more.

My question is, what next? What should I work on? It's fun to go
fast, it's fun to work on long carves when the resorts aren't crowded,
but, what else? Anyone else been stuck at this point? I know there
are a lot of experienced riders on this forum, so, what am I missing
out on?

Thanks
Eric

  #2  
Old February 25th 05, 07:35 PM
Neil Gendzwill
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Eric wrote:

My question is, what next? What should I work on?


If you're not interested in tricks, push yourself with the terrain. You
say you're not good at moguls - ride them! You say you enjoy blue-black
terrain - get yourself on something harder! Not good at trees, either -
ride some more of them! Push yourself out of your comfort zone. Are
you crashing at all? No crash, no learn.

Or are you looking for technical tips on overcoming these things? If so
you might have to get a little more specific.

Neil

  #3  
Old February 25th 05, 08:13 PM
Eric
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Neil,

I don't think I'm solely looking for technical tips, I'm more
interested to see what kind of riding the users of this forum
enjoy...maybe to gain a little direction from other's experiences.

As far as pushing myself, you're probably right...I've grown
comfortable with my riding (and not crashing).

I've searched the forum for mogul techniques...my board seems to be a
little unwieldy on some of the tighter tree and mogul runs. I have a
hard time lifting it for quick turns and maneuvering it in tight spots.
Does anything about my setup blatantly suggest I'll have problems
attempting to tackle either of these aspects of my riding?

Board: Ride Mountain 163 (replaced by the Yukon)
Stance: Goofy
Binding Settings: -9/+15 duck foot
Height: 6'1"
Weight: 160 lbs
Vans Switch Compatible Boots: I use them with strap-ins and step-ins
with no forward lean because the boots are too stiff.

Thanks
Eric

  #4  
Old February 25th 05, 08:25 PM
Neil Gendzwill
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Eric wrote:
Neil,

I don't think I'm solely looking for technical tips, I'm more
interested to see what kind of riding the users of this forum
enjoy...maybe to gain a little direction from other's experiences.


I like any sort of riding that's not in the park, especially bumps and
steeps, often combined. I'm usually the only snowboarder anywhere near
the steep bump runs. My normal ride is an all-mountain alpine board
with 45/40 angles and hard boots, and this year I added a Tanker 200
which I ride at a little lower angles.

Does anything about my setup blatantly suggest I'll have problems
attempting to tackle either of these aspects of my riding?


That's quite the radical duck stance. I really can't comment too much
on the duck thing as I don't do it and it just doesn't look functional
to me for the sort of riding I like to do. But there's lots of good
riders who make duck work for them so I've given up on being overly
critical of it. Maybe others can comment on the board itself - IIRC
some of the Rides are pretty stiff. But if you've only been riding two
years I don't think it's like you're sucking because you're not doing as
well as you'd like in bumps and trees.

Neil

  #5  
Old February 25th 05, 08:43 PM
Robert Stevahn
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Fri, 25 Feb 2005 15:25:50 -0600, Neil Gendzwill
wrote:

That's quite the radical duck stance. I really can't comment too much
on the duck thing as I don't do it and it just doesn't look functional
to me for the sort of riding I like to do. But there's lots of good
riders who make duck work for them so I've given up on being overly
critical of it.


If you look at the team pages of the various vendors, you'll find the
vast majority of park/pipe riders with a duck stance. I'm
experimenting with it now and enjoying it. Changing from 30/20 to
27/-3 or 24/-6 has given me more confidence somehow. In particular, I
have an easier time transitioning to toe-side turns.

Maybe others can comment on the board itself - IIRC
some of the Rides are pretty stiff.


Not compared to a Donek, but the last time I tried a Timeless it was
certainly pretty stiff.

I wonder if Eric's board may be a bit long for moguls and tight trees.
Do you get the feeling like the board is just a little too fast for
you in these situations? I get that with my Donek Incline 160. I
demoed a Salomon ERA 158 and absolutely loved it in the steeps and
moguls, but it didn't give me the speed I like on the groomers and
flats. I do not yet know if there's a single board that will give me
both, but I'll continue my quest.

But if you've only been riding two
years I don't think it's like you're sucking because you're not doing as
well as you'd like in bumps and trees.


No kidding! This is year 6 for me and I'm just getting there, though I
started at the relatively advanced age of 39 and have to be a little
cautious with the aging body.

-- Robert
  #6  
Old February 25th 05, 09:08 PM
Neil Gendzwill
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Robert Stevahn wrote:

I wonder if Eric's board may be a bit long for moguls and tight trees.


At 163 I seriously doubt it. I mean, the moguls were all made with skis
longer than that and to me that's what counts, length-wise. Besides
it's not really a very long board. But it may well be overly stiff for
him as a 160 lb intermediate - that's why I asked others more familiar
with Ride to comment. Also it's wide-waisted and he's got a very
splayed duck stance, so getting from edge to edge quickly will be an issue.

Neil

  #7  
Old February 25th 05, 08:31 PM
bri719
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Neil Gendzwill wrote:

If you're not interested in tricks, push yourself with the terrain.
You say you're not good at moguls - ride them! You say you enjoy
blue-black terrain - get yourself on something harder! Not good at
trees, either - ride some more of them! Push yourself out of your
comfort zone. Are you crashing at all? No crash, no learn.



yeah, I agree with that....try riding some black diamonds (single)
before the season is over, you won't regret it. then it'll be a great
point for you to build off for the start of next season.

you're definitely not a beginner. somewhere in the catch-all
intermediate group. sounds a lot like where I was about a year or two
ago. some days I still feel like I'm intermediate, and don't do a whole
lot of technical park stuff. but I know I can take about any run that
most resorts have to offer so I'm more like on the lower level of what
some would call advanced.

well we've all been there, just keep riding and you'll get out of it. I
swear :-)

good luck,
bri

--

* enjoying the karma *
remove LKJSDFJSD from address to email


  #8  
Old February 25th 05, 07:41 PM
Robert Stevahn
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On 25 Feb 2005 12:07:08 -0800, "Eric" wrote:

My question is, what next? What should I work on?


What do you want to do, ultimately?

If you want to get good at moguls, about all I can suggest is
practice. You'll eventually stumble upon "finding a rhythm", which is
what moguls are all about. Look where you're going, but try to have
your next couple of turns planned at all times. This can be
frustrating, but eventually it'll click. I'm not reliable yet, but
I've made definite progress this year.

I think riding switch is also an important advanced ability, if for no
other reason than when you get into trouble -- and you will if you're
adventurous -- you'll have a much better chance of getting out of
trouble. Ultimately, no matter which way you might be thrown, you'll
have the skill to ride it out.

Needless to say, if you want to start spinning, riding switch is a
requirement.

Around here, that choppy stuff is frequently referred to as "crud".

-- Robert
  #9  
Old February 25th 05, 09:40 PM
Dean
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Eric wrote:
My question is, what next? What should I work on?


The question is, "Why do you board?".

Boarding is a means to an end for me. I like being outdoors. I like
being physically active. I like being "backcountry". Boarding is a way
for me to do that while adding some thrills that an activity like
x-country skiing does not have. (I did a lot of XC many years ago.)

I need to improve my skills to get into the type of terrain that I want
to experience. When I can do that then I have a planet (the parts with
snow) to explore. Unfortunately I cannot gain certain skills at the
local hills, which means improvement might be slow in coming unless I
take more trips to a place like Colorado.

Some day I might be too feeble from age to get outdoors, but so far in
49 years I have not tired of being outdoors.

Dean
  #10  
Old February 25th 05, 09:51 PM
Chris J.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Eric" wrote in message
oups.com...
Well, I seem to be stuck in a rut, and I'm hoping to draw on the
experience of others in this group. This is my second season
snowboarding, and I don't really know where I'm at with my riding right
now.

I don't know what *level* I'm at--advanced beginner, maybe? I mostly
ride in Southern Colorado where there's pretty much always good
snow--powder, or a few inches of soft choppy stuff (what is that?), and
always good snow in the trees. I don't particularly enjoy the bigger
resorts in Summit County, due to all of the people-traffic and lines.
I primarily enjoy Blue or Blue/Black runs without either no moguls or
at least spread out, low profile bumps. I like to go fast, and I think
I can carve a decent line (my tracks are definitive, S-shape and thin).
I try keep my side-slipping to a minimum, and only when I need to
scrub speed. I enjoy riding through sparsely populated tree areas.
I'm not good at moguls or real tree runs--I'm a thin guy (6'1", 160
lbs) with a stiff, wide board. I've been hitting straight jumps and
rails the terrain park, but I enjoy finding kickers along/amongst the
trees a little more.

My question is, what next? What should I work on? It's fun to go
fast, it's fun to work on long carves when the resorts aren't crowded,
but, what else? Anyone else been stuck at this point? I know there
are a lot of experienced riders on this forum, so, what am I missing
out on?

Thanks
Eric


Seems like you're doing really well so maybe just keep doing more of what
you're doing now.

And ride more trees, increase your general and boarding-specific fitness
level, learn how to tune your board, learn to ride switch, ride different
mountains, find a group of riders (including skiers) to hang with that push
your limits, have someone take video of you riding and break down your
technique afterwards, enter a boarder x or slopestyle comp.

Have fun and follow your muse.

Chris


 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 11:45 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2018 SkiBanter.
The comments are property of their posters.