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is plastic wax scraper necessary?



 
 
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  #1  
Old December 13th 04, 11:56 PM
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Default is plastic wax scraper necessary?

I want to start waxing my board but never did it before.

just wondering if those plastic wax scraper with a square edge is
really useful.

can't I just use something like a putty knife?
At the hardware store, I found a 12inch long paint guide ($4) - it has
a 12inch x 4inch metal edge and plastic handle. I would think that
would scrape stuff better than a square piece of plastic.

please let me know if you've used a plastic scrapper and if it's worth
$8 - $10.

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  #2  
Old December 14th 04, 12:01 AM
Mike T
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I want to start waxing my board but never did it before.

just wondering if those plastic wax scraper with a square edge is
really useful.

can't I just use something like a putty knife?
At the hardware store, I found a 12inch long paint guide ($4) - it has
a 12inch x 4inch metal edge and plastic handle. I would think that
would scrape stuff better than a square piece of plastic.

please let me know if you've used a plastic scrapper and if it's worth
$8 - $10.


$8 - $10 seems like a lot for a plastic scraper. The most I've paid is $4
or $5.

I tried a putty knife and it flexed too much which made it skip which can
nick your base.

I find a "ski sized" scraper works better than a "Snowboard sized" scraper
for this reason as well - less flex, less skipping, wax comes off more
evenly.


  #3  
Old December 14th 04, 12:11 AM
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Mike,
thanks, everything in Cali cost more. =(
okay, now I get why they're shaped like a thick piece of plastic (so it
doesn't flex).
I'll check if that paint guide thing flexes. if not, I ain't paying $8
plus tax.

what do you mean by ski-sized vs snowboard sized?
do you mean like a 10' scrapper vs 6' ?

  #4  
Old December 14th 04, 12:32 AM
Mike T
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what do you mean by ski-sized vs snowboard sized?
do you mean like a 10' scrapper vs 6' ?


Yep - the one I use is actually 5 inches wide, and 1/4" thick:

http://www.race-werks.com/product.ph...6000&cat_id=18

Mike T


  #5  
Old December 14th 04, 03:39 AM
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Sharp scrapers are key to a good wax job. Buy several of those
scrapers or equivalent all at once. You'll thank me later! A scraper
only lasts for a few wax jobs and they need to be completely clean to
work right. You save a lot of work with a sharp scraper.

Personally, I use paste. Start with a good hot wax and paste can keep
you going for weeks. I like F4 and toko because the dry on hard and
rub in.

  #6  
Old December 14th 04, 04:09 PM
Eric
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I agree, use the ski-sized scraper vice the snowboard sized scraper.
Much better results.

Eric

  #7  
Old December 14th 04, 04:20 PM
Mike T
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Sharp scrapers are key to a good wax job. Buy several of those
scrapers or equivalent all at once. You'll thank me later! A scraper
only lasts for a few wax jobs and they need to be completely clean to
work right. You save a lot of work with a sharp scraper.


Scrapers can be brought back to life though! I find using a fine metal
file followed by 400 grit sandpaper will resore smoothness and sharpness to
a plastic scraper. I run the file flat along the scraping edges and then
use the 400 grit sandpaper to smoothe any rough spots. I would guess that I
file/sand a scraper after maybe 40 usages though, not just a few. I used
to wear 'em down faster, the less wax one uses, the less scraping and the
less wear on the scraper!


Personally, I use paste. Start with a good hot wax and paste can keep
you going for weeks. I like F4 and toko because the dry on hard and
rub in.


I have never tried paste... but since I find hot waxing to be a kind of
waxing ritual after a long day of working in front of a computer, my quiver
is always waxed up and ready to go

BTW my favorite "inexpensive but effective" brand of wax is SVST Ultra-Wax.
Those 10 ounce bricks last forever even if you are obsessive about waxing
like I am. The yellow is great for spring riding and for hot-scraping.
(Note that they doi *not* follow the same color scheme as Swix or Toko)

Link: http://www.race-werks.com/product.ph...4100&cat_id=17

Mike T


  #8  
Old December 15th 04, 05:16 AM
Mike M. Miskulin
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wrote in news:1102982176.820967.142340
@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com:

I want to start waxing my board but never did it before.

just wondering if those plastic wax scraper with a square edge is
really useful.


I've found the plastic scrapers get dull really fast. They can
be revived, but its a PITA.

Lately I've taken to using this guy he

http://www.blades.com/product/index....tId=141882&cp=
698548.1209832&parentPage=family

Its a wide scraper - hard plastic casing with a small metal edge.
You do need to be a little more careful with it, but it makes
much quicker work of things. I also find it can be cambered
slighly when needed (no board is 100% level across its whole
surface).

Don't forget to get a structure brush too.

  #9  
Old December 15th 04, 09:41 PM
Dmitry
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"Mike M. Miskulin" wrote

just wondering if those plastic wax scraper with a square edge is
really useful.


Its a wide scraper - hard plastic casing with a small metal edge.
You do need to be a little more careful with it, but it makes
much quicker work of things.


I just use a plain metal scraper. But I scrape the majority of extra
wax when it's still hot, so the effort (and a risk of messing up the base)
is minimal.

Then I just finish it off with 1) CD disk cover plastic "scraper",
2) scotch-brite pad and 3) structure brush


  #10  
Old December 15th 04, 09:51 PM
Dmitry
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"Dmitry" wrote

I just use a plain metal scraper. But I scrape the majority of extra
wax when it's still hot, so the effort (and a risk of messing up the base)
is minimal.


YEah, forgot to mention that the idea here is that by scraping the wax
while it's still hot you get to put some pressure on it so that it'll
get into the base pores even better.

I have no idea if it actually works, but sure is much quicker to remove
excess wax while it's still soft. And much less messy, creates one big
pile of wax instead of a bunch of little sticky pieces that are hard to
clean.


 




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