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motion sickness



 
 
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  #1  
Old January 17th 19, 02:12 PM posted to rec.skiing.alpine
Harvard Horvath
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Posts: 102
Default motion sickness

I've been thinking of writing a paper on motion sickness. We've been
studying space sickness in my astronautics class. As a man of action,
adventure, and danger, I've experienced motion sickness many times.

My instructor says that when he's been up in the space shuttle for
several months and he gets back on land, he experiences some vertigo
that takes about 20-25 minutes to go away. Many people have
experiences this when leaving a boat. We call it getting our, "land
legs," back. And for me it only takes a few seconds. But I've never
spent six months on a boat.

I've noticed many times while doing a fast descent on a black diamond
and doing a hockey stop at the bottom, I often feel a sense of
vertigo, which takes a moment to go away. Has anyone else felt this?

I attribute this to gravity. While going downhill rapidly, gravity is
reduced and your heart pumps more blood to your head. While stopping
rapidly there is much more gravity pulling on you and the blood pools
toward your legs. The same thing happens in zero-gravity.

Any discussion on this will be appreciated.

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  #2  
Old January 17th 19, 03:37 PM posted to rec.skiing.alpine
lal_truckee
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Posts: 1,348
Default motion sickness

On 1/17/19 7:12 AM, Harvard Horvath wrote:
While going downhill rapidly, gravity is
reduced and your heart pumps more blood to your head. While stopping
rapidly there is much more gravity pulling on you and the blood pools
toward your legs. The same thing happens in zero-gravity


I doubt the suggests relationship holds. rather, I suspect you
unknowingly bumped your head on a fellow skier while transiting the
downhill portion of your exciting ski journey leading to enhanced
passion for all things downhill.
  #3  
Old January 17th 19, 04:41 PM posted to rec.skiing.alpine
The Real Bev[_4_]
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Posts: 1,200
Default motion sickness

On 01/17/2019 07:12 AM, Harvard Horvath wrote:
I've been thinking of writing a paper on motion sickness. We've been
studying space sickness in my astronautics class. As a man of action,
adventure, and danger, I've experienced motion sickness many times.

My instructor says that when he's been up in the space shuttle for
several months and he gets back on land, he experiences some vertigo
that takes about 20-25 minutes to go away. Many people have
experiences this when leaving a boat. We call it getting our, "land
legs," back. And for me it only takes a few seconds. But I've never
spent six months on a boat.

I've noticed many times while doing a fast descent on a black diamond
and doing a hockey stop at the bottom, I often feel a sense of
vertigo, which takes a moment to go away. Has anyone else felt this?

I attribute this to gravity. While going downhill rapidly, gravity is
reduced and your heart pumps more blood to your head. While stopping
rapidly there is much more gravity pulling on you and the blood pools
toward your legs. The same thing happens in zero-gravity.

Any discussion on this will be appreciated.


https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/...l-201208065110

Look up otoliths and otoconia.

Welcome to adulthood.

--
Cheers, Bev
Of course SoCal has four seasons:
Earthquake, Mudslide, Brushfire, and Riot
  #4  
Old January 18th 19, 11:15 PM posted to rec.skiing.alpine
Harvard Horvath
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Posts: 102
Default motion sickness

[Default] On Thu, 17 Jan 2019 08:37:53 -0800, lal_truckee
wrote this crap:

On 1/17/19 7:12 AM, Harvard Horvath wrote:
While going downhill rapidly, gravity is
reduced and your heart pumps more blood to your head. While stopping
rapidly there is much more gravity pulling on you and the blood pools
toward your legs. The same thing happens in zero-gravity


I doubt the suggests relationship holds. rather, I suspect you
unknowingly bumped your head on a fellow skier while transiting the
downhill portion of your exciting ski journey leading to enhanced
passion for all things downhill.


Gee! I hadn't considered that. I had considered that you were an
idiot.


-------------------------------------------------------------

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  #5  
Old January 18th 19, 11:38 PM posted to rec.skiing.alpine
Harvard Horvath
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 102
Default motion sickness

[Default] On Thu, 17 Jan 2019 09:41:12 -0800, The Real Bev
wrote this crap:

On 01/17/2019 07:12 AM, Harvard Horvath wrote:
I've been thinking of writing a paper on motion sickness. We've been
studying space sickness in my astronautics class. As a man of action,
adventure, and danger, I've experienced motion sickness many times.

My instructor says that when he's been up in the space shuttle for
several months and he gets back on land, he experiences some vertigo
that takes about 20-25 minutes to go away. Many people have
experiences this when leaving a boat. We call it getting our, "land
legs," back. And for me it only takes a few seconds. But I've never
spent six months on a boat.

I've noticed many times while doing a fast descent on a black diamond
and doing a hockey stop at the bottom, I often feel a sense of
vertigo, which takes a moment to go away. Has anyone else felt this?

I attribute this to gravity. While going downhill rapidly, gravity is
reduced and your heart pumps more blood to your head. While stopping
rapidly there is much more gravity pulling on you and the blood pools
toward your legs. The same thing happens in zero-gravity.

Any discussion on this will be appreciated.


https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/...l-201208065110


Saw that in class.

Look up otoliths and otoconia.


Too little, too late. We covered the inner ear in class.

Welcome to adulthood.


Welcome to your senility. You missed the whole point of this
discussion. This is not space camp where we earn a merit badge. This
is a real college course taught in a major university, by a retired
astronaut, to earn a real degree.

I already know the causes of motion sickness, and the cures. I've
experienced many types of motion sickness, to include seasickness, air
sickness, car sickness, and the type that you get on certain rides at
amusement parks. I'm looking for people who have experienced other
types of motion sickness. For example, do you get vertigo or
dizziness while skiing or riding the lifts or tram? Or do you know
someone who does?

A good example is Trunky, who only skis the green groomed runs,
because his altitude sickness causes him to **** his pants when he
stands at the top of a black diamond run.


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  #6  
Old January 19th 19, 02:36 AM posted to rec.skiing.alpine
Harvard Horvath
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 102
Default motion sickness

[Default] On Fri, 18 Jan 2019 17:04:33 -0800 (PST), Trunky
wrote this crap:


This
is a real college course taught in a major university, by a retired
astronaut, to earn a real degree.


Bull****. What university, what astronaut,


MIT college of Engineering, and the instructor is:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jeffrey_A._Hoffman

and I thought you had something like eight
degrees from Harvard already?


You can count? And what's wrong with adding another degree?
"Knowledge is power."


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  #7  
Old January 19th 19, 07:42 AM posted to rec.skiing.alpine
BrritSki[_5_]
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Posts: 105
Default motion sickness

On 19/01/2019 00:38, Harvard Horvath wrote:
A good example is Trunky, who only skis the green groomed runs,
because his altitude sickness causes him to **** his pants when he
stands at the top of a black diamond run.


I think you'll find that Scat suffers from aTtitude sickness. HTH HAND

  #8  
Old January 19th 19, 04:37 PM posted to rec.skiing.alpine
The Real Bev[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,200
Default motion sickness

On 01/18/2019 04:38 PM, Harvard Horvath wrote:

I already know the causes of motion sickness, and the cures. I've
experienced many types of motion sickness, to include seasickness, air
sickness, car sickness, and the type that you get on certain rides at
amusement parks. I'm looking for people who have experienced other
types of motion sickness. For example, do you get vertigo or
dizziness while skiing or riding the lifts or tram? Or do you know
someone who does?


No, but I do know the frustration of having a non-standard problem for
which there is thought to be A Standard Solution.

How about this -- your eardrum is more sensitive than most to changes in
altitude and this somehow affects your inner ear mechanisms?

--
Cheers, Bev
Don't you just KNOW that there is more than one
Sierra Club member who is absolutely sure that the
dinosaurs died out because of something humans did?
  #9  
Old January 19th 19, 04:54 PM posted to rec.skiing.alpine
Harvard Horvath
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 102
Default motion sickness

[Default] On Sat, 19 Jan 2019 09:37:28 -0800, The Real Bev
wrote this crap:

On 01/18/2019 04:38 PM, Harvard Horvath wrote:

I already know the causes of motion sickness, and the cures. I've
experienced many types of motion sickness, to include seasickness, air
sickness, car sickness, and the type that you get on certain rides at
amusement parks. I'm looking for people who have experienced other
types of motion sickness. For example, do you get vertigo or
dizziness while skiing or riding the lifts or tram? Or do you know
someone who does?


No, but I do know the frustration of having a non-standard problem for
which there is thought to be A Standard Solution.

How about this -- your eardrum is more sensitive than most to changes in
altitude and this somehow affects your inner ear mechanisms?


It's not always true that the inner ear causes motion sickness. Space
sickness occurs in a zero gravity enviroment. Many times it's caused
by the eyes. This was explained in class. They showed us pictures of
famous people upside down and they were unrecognizable. Ever tried to
read a paper upside down? It's nearly impossible. I've even heard of
people who get motion sickness sitting on their couch playing video
games.



-------------------------------------------------------------

This signature is now the ultimate power in the Universe


Horvath

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  #10  
Old January 19th 19, 05:10 PM posted to rec.skiing.alpine
The Real Bev[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,200
Default motion sickness

On 01/19/2019 09:54 AM, Harvard Horvath wrote:
[Default] On Sat, 19 Jan 2019 09:37:28 -0800, The Real Bev
wrote this crap:

On 01/18/2019 04:38 PM, Harvard Horvath wrote:

I already know the causes of motion sickness, and the cures. I've
experienced many types of motion sickness, to include seasickness, air
sickness, car sickness, and the type that you get on certain rides at
amusement parks. I'm looking for people who have experienced other
types of motion sickness. For example, do you get vertigo or
dizziness while skiing or riding the lifts or tram? Or do you know
someone who does?


No, but I do know the frustration of having a non-standard problem for
which there is thought to be A Standard Solution.

How about this -- your eardrum is more sensitive than most to changes in
altitude and this somehow affects your inner ear mechanisms?


It's not always true that the inner ear causes motion sickness. Space
sickness occurs in a zero gravity enviroment. Many times it's caused
by the eyes. This was explained in class. They showed us pictures of
famous people upside down and they were unrecognizable. Ever tried to
read a paper upside down? It's nearly impossible. I've even heard of
people who get motion sickness sitting on their couch playing video
games.


I took FauxPro video of my last skiing trip. The thing is set at wide
angle and is mounted on a chest strap. Watching it full-screen makes
me feel dizzy. I assume this is the seasickness thing caused by the
difference between what your ears feel and your eyes see.

I'm glad I bought a cheap one. The result is fine technically but sucks
artistically. It claims to be phone-controllable, but whenever I try to
link them up the android app crashes. I need to phone Wasp, but I dread
talking to helpdroids. One of these days.

--
Cheers, Bev
Politicians are stupid like cats are stupid.
 




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