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best digital camera for skiing?



 
 
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  #1  
Old January 11th 04, 10:22 PM
James Bassuk
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Default best digital camera for skiing?

it needs to take great pics, be quick to boot, and be small enough to fit
into a ski jacket pocket.

all feedback is welcome!

thanks,
jim bassuk
edmonds, wa

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  #2  
Old January 12th 04, 12:34 AM
AstroPax
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On Sun, 11 Jan 2004 16:22:54 CST, James Bassuk
wrote:

it needs to take great pics, be quick to boot, and be small enough to fit
into a ski jacket pocket.


James,

You're definitely limiting yourself by requiring that the camera fit
in the pocket of your ski jacket, unless you have really BIG pockets.

Therefore, you can pretty much rule out a full-size digital SLR. That
alone should save you a few bucks....however, don't expect anything
close to pro quality (powder mag) pics with a pocket-sized point and
shoot. With a pocket-sized point and shoot, you'll have to accept
just plain old "good pics" with the occasional you-got-lucky "great
pic" thrown in from time to time.

In the world of digital cameras, you get what you pay for, generally
speaking. The more you pay, the bigger the cameras and lenses
become...resulting in a higher potential for "great pics". That's
just a fact of photography life.

Notice, above, that I used the word "potential". That's because some
people just can't take a decent photo, even with $10,000 of high-end
hardware hanging from their neck. In the world of alpine skiing
photography, we call this type of equipment possessed photographer a
"Texan". They are usually at the Rich Amateur (Level 2), or the
Equipment Measurbator (Bottom Level 1) of the 7 levels of
photographers:

http://www.kenrockwell.com/tech/7.htm

Ooops, sorry to get off track there.

Anyway, you didn't mention it, but for skiing, you definitely want a
camera that can shoot 2 to 3 frames per second (fps), or better, in
the continuous mode. Otherwise, you'll end up missing out on the good
ski action sequence shots.

Anyway, if you are looking for a full-size digital SLR, I can
definitely point you in the right direction.

However, there are a zillion digital point and shoot pocket cameras
out there, therefore, as a starting point, I suggest that you dig
around he

http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/

-Astro

---
maximum exposure f/2.8
http://www.xmission.com/~hound/astro/03-04/index.htm
---


  #3  
Old January 12th 04, 03:55 AM
leo
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Default



it needs to take great pics, be quick to boot, and be small enough to fit
into a ski jacket pocket.

all feedback is welcome!

thanks,
jim bassuk
edmonds, wa


Go small!.. if it is big you won't take it with you and then you will have
no pictures at all. Max pixels as your budget allows. I actually take a
tiny Leica 35mm most of the time because when I ski I have to make myself
and friends stop for pixs and a roll of 24 or 36 is more stops than anyone
wants to pose for. Have fun and save some memories!

leo

leo


  #4  
Old January 12th 04, 03:55 AM
Jon Bond
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"AstroPax" wrote in message
...
On Sun, 11 Jan 2004 16:22:54 CST, James Bassuk
wrote:

it needs to take great pics, be quick to boot, and be small enough to fit
into a ski jacket pocket.


James,

You're definitely limiting yourself by requiring that the camera fit
in the pocket of your ski jacket, unless you have really BIG pockets.

Therefore, you can pretty much rule out a full-size digital SLR. That
alone should save you a few bucks....however, don't expect anything
close to pro quality (powder mag) pics with a pocket-sized point and
shoot. With a pocket-sized point and shoot, you'll have to accept
just plain old "good pics" with the occasional you-got-lucky "great
pic" thrown in from time to time.

In the world of digital cameras, you get what you pay for, generally
speaking. The more you pay, the bigger the cameras and lenses
become...resulting in a higher potential for "great pics". That's
just a fact of photography life.

Notice, above, that I used the word "potential". That's because some
people just can't take a decent photo, even with $10,000 of high-end
hardware hanging from their neck. In the world of alpine skiing
photography, we call this type of equipment possessed photographer a
"Texan". They are usually at the Rich Amateur (Level 2), or the
Equipment Measurbator (Bottom Level 1) of the 7 levels of
photographers:

http://www.kenrockwell.com/tech/7.htm

Ooops, sorry to get off track there.

Anyway, you didn't mention it, but for skiing, you definitely want a
camera that can shoot 2 to 3 frames per second (fps), or better, in
the continuous mode. Otherwise, you'll end up missing out on the good
ski action sequence shots.

Anyway, if you are looking for a full-size digital SLR, I can
definitely point you in the right direction.

However, there are a zillion digital point and shoot pocket cameras
out there, therefore, as a starting point, I suggest that you dig
around he

http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/

-Astro

---
maximum exposure f/2.8
http://www.xmission.com/~hound/astro/03-04/index.htm


Any suggestions for the point and shoots though? I've got a 35mm SLR I can
take along when I want to get a great shot... granted its super old, all
manual, and has no motor wind, but hey, whatever. I've been looking at the
canon S50, and kind of at the dimage Z1 but I think its too big to take
skiing and biking without a big backpack, which I don't always want to drag
around. Plus for those situations where I'm at a party or just taking
candid shots, its a bit... pretentious.

Thanks!

Jon Bond



  #5  
Old January 12th 04, 05:12 AM
AstroPax
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On Sun, 11 Jan 2004 21:55:53 CST, "Jon Bond"
wrote:

Any suggestions for the point and shoots though?


Point and shoots? I don't know. That would take some research.

But I would definitely take a very close look at any of the "highly
recommended" ones listed on dpreview:

http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/default.asp?view=rating

Nail it down to a few choices based on specifications, and then make a
decision after handling each one in-store. Ergonomics are very
important.

-Astro


  #6  
Old January 12th 04, 03:50 PM
Jeff Davis
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In article ington.edu,
James Bassuk wrote:
it needs to take great pics, be quick to boot, and be small enough to fit
into a ski jacket pocket.


I kicked down for a Sony DCR-TRV33 Handy Cam this season. It takes
1 Megapixel stills on the memory card while you're filming with Mini DV
Sony Premium tape. Now I throw a lightweight tripod in my backcountry
pack with the shovel, probe, stove, and down suit. It weighs in a little
more than a pound, and its great for scurrying around the high alpine crags.
The resolution is exceptional. You can check that out for yourself in the
new TGR flick, "High Life." That's what sold me on Sony video, and Sony
sponsors TGR nowadays.
--
According to John Perry Barlow, "Jeff Davis is a truly gifted trouble-maker."


  #7  
Old January 12th 04, 08:22 PM
bdubya
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On Sun, 11 Jan 2004 16:22:54 CST, James Bassuk
wrote:

it needs to take great pics, be quick to boot, and be small enough to fit
into a ski jacket pocket.


I don't own one myself, but you should take a long cold look at the
Canon ELPHs; they're about the size of a deck of cards, they feel
REALLY robust (I haven't done the drop test on one, but they feel
really tough), and take good pix. Boot time seems reasonable. and
I've been impressed with each one I've used.

I've got an Olympus c700 myself, which is nice because it has a 10x
optical zoom, and handles varying light conditions REALLY well. But
it's slow to boot, a little bulky, and doesn't feel quite as solid as
I'd like for skiing (I think this would apply to most Olympi with the
same shell, of which there are several). I take it skiing, but tend
to keep it buried in the pack, rather than in a pocket where it would
be more accessible. Great camera for some uses, but not for skiing.

bw

  #9  
Old January 14th 04, 04:10 PM
GR
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I like the Olympus point and shoots which have the integral sliding cover
(to cover the lens). Most also take AA batteries so that potential problem
is quickly remedied.
gr
"James Bassuk" wrote in message
. washington.edu...
it needs to take great pics, be quick to boot, and be small enough to fit
into a ski jacket pocket.

all feedback is welcome!

thanks,
jim bassuk
edmonds, wa



  #10  
Old January 14th 04, 04:40 PM
Chester Bullock
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Default

GR wrote:

I like the Olympus point and shoots which have the integral sliding cover
(to cover the lens). Most also take AA batteries so that potential problem
is quickly remedied.
gr


My Olympus D-490Zoom survived a good tumble down North Pole at A-Basin.
Batteries went flying, but everything dried out and now my
step-daughter uses the camera since I got my G5...
----------------------
Chester

He who laughs last didn't get the joke.

 




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