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Back Country Skiing?



 
 
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  #11  
Old February 25th 06, 01:12 PM
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Here in the Midwest (Minnesota) "backcountry" skiing is anywhere away
from support. It may be groomed (like the Banadad Trail in the BWCA
Wilderness Area) or not. (like the rest of the BWCA) Being a whole lot
more horizontal here than the Northeast or the West, you have to ski or
snowshoe in to where you are going and do the same coming back out.
Heli-skiing??? I suppose our equivalent would be dog sledding, because
motorized equipment is not allowed.

In the Twin Cities our snow his winter has been pretty iffy, but up
north, from Fargo to Grand Rapida to Ely and Duluth, and then over to
Ashland, WI and the U.P of Michigan, which is where our backcountry
really is...the string of state and national forests around Lake
Superior they are having a great year. It snowed a foot in Duluth
yesterday.

Ski safe,
Hans/Trailpatrol

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  #12  
Old February 28th 06, 01:25 PM
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On Sat, 25 Feb 2006 00:21:02 GMT, lal_truckee
wrote:

Europe: skiing off piste is your problem.


Did you mean "out of bounds?" Even Euros ski off piste sometimes.


I'd never heard the expression "out of bounds" before I visited a US
mountain. I don't think it really has much meaning in Europe. With
the exception of areas protected for environmental reasons, you can
pretty much go where you want. Of course, you might die there, but
that's your problem.

I was really shocked when on my first visit to the US (Lake Tahoe) I
saw a rope with a notice about whatever bit of the penal code I'd be
breaking if I ducked under it.
--
Champ
  #13  
Old February 28th 06, 01:44 PM
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Am Dienstag, den 28.02.2006, 14:25 +0000 schrieb Champ:

I'd never heard the expression "out of bounds" before I visited a US
mountain. I don't think it really has much meaning in Europe. With
the exception of areas protected for environmental reasons, you can
pretty much go where you want. Of course, you might die there, but
that's your problem.

I was really shocked when on my first visit to the US (Lake Tahoe) I
saw a rope with a notice about whatever bit of the penal code I'd be
breaking if I ducked under it.


In the Alps (and Scandinavia as well) the freedom to go everywhere it is
due to the allmend rights (allman rights). The terrain (the mountains)
do not belong to a juridical person (a single person, a company or
whatelse) but to the comunity. So you cannot obstacle the persons to go
there. (Some exceptions for Italy and Austria).

That's even the case if, let's say, a lift company closes the runs for
avalange danger etc. People can pass there anyway - but as you say
correctly - on their own risk.

Generally, i do not think there is so much difference between
backcountry in USA and Canada and the Alps on the other hand (we call it
ski randonnee or, in Sweden or Norway fjelltelemarking). But, i think,
the Alps have a closer infrastructure of huts, cabane ecc. And an
excellent and close emergency support.

As for the mortal accidents in avalanches, i don't think there's so much
difference between the Alps and Northamerica - at least not if you put
the accidents in comparison to the people doing ski randonnee ...

Greetings,

Ulrich

  #14  
Old February 28th 06, 07:36 PM
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"Booker C. Bense"
[email protected] slac.stanford.edu wrote
in message ...
-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----

In article [email protected],
News wrote:
I don't know the deffinition for back country skiing. Would someone please
tell me what it is?


If you're using your own effort to get up the hills and you're
not skiing on a prepared track, that's backcountry skiing. Covers
everything from a short jaunt in your back yard to skiing down
Everest.

_ Booker C. Bense


Thanks that is what I thought but I was not sure



--

Totus possum, totum Deum.
Totus ero, totum meum.
WSW


  #15  
Old March 1st 06, 07:04 AM
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[ Booker C. Bense ]

If you're using your own effort to get up the hills and you're
not skiing on a prepared track, that's backcountry skiing. Covers
everything from a short jaunt in your back yard to skiing down
Everest.


I more or less agree, but what do you call xc skiing on groomed tracks
in the backcountry? Around here we have vast networks of (different
states of) groomed tracks streching far into the woods and the
mountains. There are marked routes deep in the mountains run regularly
with snowmobiles but without set tracks -- not snowmobile routes, we
don't have those outside of the far North as recreational snowmobiling
is banned, they are run with snowmobiles to pack the snow and mark the
route for skiers. Does it turn from deep backcountry in summer to not
backcountry in winter because a groomed track was laid down?


Martin
--
"An ideal world is left as an exercise to the reader."
-Paul Graham, On Lisp
  #16  
Old March 1st 06, 08:02 AM
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Booker C. Bense
If you're using your own effort to get up the hills and you're
not skiing on a prepared track, that's backcountry skiing. Covers
everything from a short jaunt in your back yard to skiing down
Everest.


Martin Thornquist
I more or less agree,


I think I'd agree completely with Booker here.

but what do you call xc skiing on groomed tracks in the
backcountry?


Track skiing. Modern groomed tracks are a far cry from natural
conditions. Modern tiny XC racing gear excels on these, but,
depending on the snow conditions, going off the track with
such gear is hopeless.

Perhaps a bit like the difference between road cycling and
mountain biking. Except bigger.

Speaking of cycling, a prepared XC-skiing track (skating style) is
great for cycling. In summer too, btw.
  #17  
Old March 1st 06, 08:30 AM
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On Thu, 23 Feb 2006 19:54:51 +0000 (UTC), Booker C. Bense
[email protected] slac.stanford.edu
wrote:

I don't know the deffinition for back country skiing. Would someone please
tell me what it is?


If you're using your own effort to get up the hills and you're
not skiing on a prepared track, that's backcountry skiing.


I have to use my own effort? Really? Can't I use a helicopter?
Please?
--
Champ
  #18  
Old March 1st 06, 09:00 AM
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[ *@*.* ]

Martin Thornquist
but what do you call xc skiing on groomed tracks in the
backcountry?


Track skiing. Modern groomed tracks are a far cry from natural
conditions. Modern tiny XC racing gear excels on these, but,
depending on the snow conditions, going off the track with
such gear is hopeless.


My main point was in the part you snipped, that there is a continuum
from perfectly groomed tracks which I wouldn't call "backcountry" via
several categories down to marked routes only done once in a while
with snowmobile to maintain marking and pack the snow somewhat. What
do you call backcountry and what not?

Perhaps a bit like the difference between road cycling and
mountain biking. Except bigger.


This is pretty similar, there's a wide selection of paved roads, good
gravel roads, not so good gravel roads, good paths, smaller paths.
I've biked on all of them (well, dragged the bike along the smallest
paths), and I'm not sure where you would draw the lines. Some people
use cyclocross (beefed-up road racers) for path biking these days...

Speaking of cycling, a prepared XC-skiing track (skating style) is
great for cycling. In summer too, btw.


Around here they can be great for a while (in summer), and then
suddenly you're in the middle of a swamp with mud up to the knees. :-)


Martin
--
"An ideal world is left as an exercise to the reader."
-Paul Graham, On Lisp
 




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