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  #11  
Old December 16th 03, 05:08 PM
Chester Bullock
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snoig wrote:

Try those lines Monique, you may find them easier since they were made
by pros. Also when it comes to bump skiing, shaped skis = bad.
Pretty much all bumpers still use the old school straight skis. I'm
sure there will be plenty of arguments from this group and the most
vocal will probably be the ones who have never actually competed.


Never one to back down from a challenge, here is my $.02 worth:

No, I have never competed in bump skiing. Did do some gate racing
though, but that likely doesn't count for beans in this discussion.
Shaped skis work well for me in the bumps. No doubt this is primarily
due to the shorter length, but they work well for my needs and my style
of bump skiing. If it works for you, no point in saying it works for
everyone. Likewise, if it doesn't work for you, no point in saying it
doesn't work for everyone.

--
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Tenxible Solutions,
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  #12  
Old December 16th 03, 06:05 PM
MattB
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"snoig" wrote in message
om...
lal_truckee wrote in message

...
snip

Try those lines Monique, you may find them easier since they were made
by pros. Also when it comes to bump skiing, shaped skis = bad.
Pretty much all bumpers still use the old school straight skis. I'm
sure there will be plenty of arguments from this group and the most
vocal will probably be the ones who have never actually competed.

snoig


Yep, the better bump skiers make the better lines, to a point. I wouldn't
send our fair friend Monique to some big, heavily pounded competition
course. I've skied some courses with ruts you could hide a VW in. The skiing
surface alternated between boilerplate hard and pummeled sugar. Neither are
particularly forgiving for the uninitiated (or anyone else).

I also agree on the ski choice. If you are competitive, then classic shapes
(straight) are the way to go. You just can't achieve the lead change speed
on shaped skis you can with true bump skis. I used to compete, but now I
just ski for fun. I never ski a true bump ski anymore because I like to ski
all over the mountain. Ever try to ski a little bump ski for some high speed
chowder turns? Pretty squirrelly! Bumps can still be skied well on shapes (I
like my Salomon Super Mountain mid-fats), but you can't get that "wiggly
worm" effect as well on them. I'm OK with that - it's still fun and I can
still stay in all but the most brutal lines.

Matt



  #13  
Old December 16th 03, 07:32 PM
MattB
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"Monique Y. Herman" wrote in message
...
On Mon, 15 Dec 2003 at 22:28 GMT, lal_truckee penned:

Input: 1) your expected lifetime (90yrs), 2) your skis expected
lifetime (120days) 3) your ski's cost, 4) your lift ticket's cost (if
you buy one), 5) maximizing your overall return on life (i.e.
maximized ski days per lifetime)

Output: All skis are rock skis. Just go for it.


Good point. What's the point of having favorite skis that you're afraid
to use?


My thoughts exactly. To a point.

I wouldn't take my best skis to go and do some packing/sidestepping where I
knew I would be walking on rocks.

On the other hand, I would take them where I knoew I'd be walking on rocks
with the promise (or hope) of fun turns to be had.

Matt



  #14  
Old December 16th 03, 07:32 PM
Monique Y. Herman
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On Tue, 16 Dec 2003 at 17:55 GMT, snoig penned:

Well, moguls also develop where the bump skiers ski. They also tend
to develop better when they are made by people who know what they are
doing. For Breck early season, the best zipper line is usually on the
left side of American under the lift. There are also some nice ego
bumps on Cresendo on Peak 8. Once everything is open, Team Breck
bumpers usually practice on Solitude and sometimes Mach 1.


I did American sunday; I don't recall if that was one of the runs on
which I stretched my bump wings or not. I do think I visited the
Crescendo ones. Thanks for the pointers!

Try those lines Monique, you may find them easier since they were made
by pros. Also when it comes to bump skiing, shaped skis = bad.
Pretty much all bumpers still use the old school straight skis. I'm
sure there will be plenty of arguments from this group and the most
vocal will probably be the ones who have never actually competed.


Well, I won't be competing in bumps any time soon, but I do know that
I'm way too lazy to switch skis for different runs ... so one multi-use
pair is all that I bring. With that in mind, I think I'm going to have
to stick with shaped.

--
monique

  #15  
Old December 16th 03, 08:24 PM
Monique Y. Herman
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On Tue, 16 Dec 2003 at 19:05 GMT, MattB penned:

Yep, the better bump skiers make the better lines, to a point. I
wouldn't send our fair friend Monique to some big, heavily pounded
competition course. I've skied some courses with ruts you could hide a
VW in. The skiing surface alternated between boilerplate hard and
pummeled sugar. Neither are particularly forgiving for the uninitiated
(or anyone else).


Your fair friend Monique definitely has no interest in such things, at
least not for now. I've seen some scary moguls, especially in the east.
I distinctly remember traversing this run with frozen-solid moguls the
size of VW busses -- though I'm having trouble remembering where. It
was either white heat at sunday river or outer limits at killington. Or
maybe it was some totally different run. Anyway, scary stuff.

The powdery fluff-moguls are probably my best bet right now -- they slow
me down so that I don't feel so overwhelmed.


--
monique

  #17  
Old December 18th 03, 01:53 AM
SkaredShtles
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Chester Bullock wrote in
:

lal_truckee wrote:

snip
Anyway, have fun, enjoy the mountains, and get the hell out of the
moguls; save them for days when the hill is crappy anyway.



In my experience, moguls are much more enjoyable when there is about 2
feet of powder on top of them...



You mean like THIS?!?:

http://www.rsn.com/cams/steam/full_s...set_id=4611960
&party_id=1129&segment_type=mtn

Hold on, there weren't any bumps in there........ even under the 2 feet of
powder.

-T.O.M.-

  #18  
Old December 18th 03, 01:55 AM
SkaredShtles
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"MattB" wrote in
:

"Chester Bullock" wrote in message
...

snip

In my experience, moguls are much more enjoyable when there is about
2 feet of powder on top of them...


I'd have to agree. In general, I've found moguls in Co are better
(more enjoyable that is) than the ones in the East just for that
reason. Big, soft moguls are pretty damn fun, IMO (see my Monarch
video for an example).


But this is even better:

http://www.rsn.com/cams/steam/full_s...set_id=4615015
&party_id=1129&segment_type=mtn

Sorry for the gratuitous pown....... Steamboat was pretty epic on Tuesday.


-T.O.M.-

  #19  
Old December 18th 03, 01:56 AM
SkaredShtles
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"Monique Y. Herman" wrote in
:

snip
Where, in Colorado and not out of bounds, would you suggest going during
the early part of the season for fewer people?


Steamboat.

Believe me, I'm having fun and enjoying the mountains. Part of that is
being able to handle any conditions -- powder, ice, and yes, even


Don't worry - you're in Colorado now. Ice is a thing of the past.........

-T.O.M.-

  #20  
Old December 18th 03, 01:55 PM
Chester Bullock
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SkaredShtles wrote:

"Monique Y. Herman" wrote in
:

snip

Where, in Colorado and not out of bounds, would you suggest going during
the early part of the season for fewer people?



Steamboat.


Believe me, I'm having fun and enjoying the mountains. Part of that is
being able to handle any conditions -- powder, ice, and yes, even



Don't worry - you're in Colorado now. Ice is a thing of the past.........


Unless you go to Keystone.
--
Chester Bullock,
Ethical, custom website hosting, design and programming
Tenxible Solutions,
http://www.tenxible.com
Web Based Autoresponder and DRIP system, http://www.toolsre.com
AIM: tenxible YahooIM: ccb247


 




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