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A quick thanks to all



 
 
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  #1  
Old April 26th 04, 06:57 PM
Lisa Horton
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Default A quick thanks to all

I don't always thank each and every person who answers my question,
mostly to avoid flooding the group with relatively content free
postings. So to those who've offered answers and opinions without a
thanks, here's a special thanks just for you. And thanks to everyone
for being patient with my ignorance of skiing.

In the case of skiing technique advice, I do appreciate every word of
it. But despite my extensive web research, I've had just a few days of
actual ski time. All the info is blending into a blur of "hands
forward, weight centered, stand up and do that thing with your foot
where you feel the edge biting into the snow". Next week I'll have two
full days to try all the things I've learned and start to understand
them. No doubt returning with ever more questions

Lisa
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  #2  
Old April 26th 04, 07:33 PM
lal_truckee
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Default A quick thanks to all

Lisa Horton wrote:
I don't always thank each and every person who answers my question,
mostly to avoid flooding the group with relatively content free
postings.


Absolutely: Content free postings never occur in a well-mannored group
such as r.s.a.


In the case of skiing technique advice, I do appreciate every word of
it. But despite my extensive web research, I've had just a few days of
actual ski time. All the info is blending into a blur of "hands
forward, weight centered, stand up and do that thing with your foot
where you feel the edge biting into the snow".


Your roller skating comments (elsewhere) are interesting - in-line
skating is a well established training tool for skiers, and particularly
racers. Racers sometime train on downhill tarmack using in-line skates,
race gates (orange cones, often,) and poles with rubber tips. Flat
(relatively flat) road skating is good stamina training using
skiing-like technique. So break out the skates to bridge over the bad
weather (aka summer.)
  #3  
Old April 26th 04, 08:36 PM
Lisa Horton
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Default A quick thanks to all



lal_truckee wrote:

Lisa Horton wrote:




In the case of skiing technique advice, I do appreciate every word of
it. But despite my extensive web research, I've had just a few days of
actual ski time. All the info is blending into a blur of "hands
forward, weight centered, stand up and do that thing with your foot
where you feel the edge biting into the snow".


Your roller skating comments (elsewhere) are interesting - in-line
skating is a well established training tool for skiers, and particularly
racers. Racers sometime train on downhill tarmack using in-line skates,
race gates (orange cones, often,) and poles with rubber tips. Flat
(relatively flat) road skating is good stamina training using
skiing-like technique. So break out the skates to bridge over the bad
weather (aka summer.)


Interesting. With conventional skates, when turning at speed, your
weight MUST go to the outside foot primarily, although your inside foot
must also stay on the ground and parallel to the outside foot. Your
outside foot is where the grip is, and thus turning power. Now that I
think about it, the smooth fluid skiers I see above from the lift chair,
what they do looks very much like how I would have skated a steeper
hill. Up to and including continuing your turn arc uphill if you really
need to lose more speed. If you're not a skater, note that at these
speeds, the toe brake is an instant face plant, and even sideways back
foot braking is quite difficult to execute successfully.

Lisa
  #4  
Old April 26th 04, 09:11 PM
klaus
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Default A quick thanks to all

Lisa Horton wrote:
All the info is blending into a blur of "hands
forward, weight centered, stand up and do that thing with your foot
where you feel the edge biting into the snow".


I'd say... you just said it better than any ski instructor I've ever
heard try to explain it.

-klaus

  #5  
Old April 26th 04, 09:44 PM
lal_truckee
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Default A quick thanks to all

klaus wrote:
Lisa Horton wrote:

All the info is blending into a blur of "hands
forward, weight centered, stand up and do that thing with your foot
where you feel the edge biting into the snow".



I'd say... you just said it better than any ski instructor I've ever
heard try to explain it.


We've been sandbagged...
  #6  
Old April 26th 04, 09:51 PM
Lisa Horton
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Default A quick thanks to all



lal_truckee wrote:

klaus wrote:
Lisa Horton wrote:

All the info is blending into a blur of "hands
forward, weight centered, stand up and do that thing with your foot
where you feel the edge biting into the snow".



I'd say... you just said it better than any ski instructor I've ever
heard try to explain it.


We've been sandbagged...


If you saw me "skiing", you'd know better

Theory is all fine and well, but it won't keep your butt off the ground.

Lisa
  #7  
Old April 26th 04, 11:25 PM
klaus
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Default A quick thanks to all

Lisa Horton wrote:
Theory is all fine and well, but it won't keep your butt off the ground.


Hah! Nothing will. Get used to it.

-klaus


  #8  
Old April 27th 04, 01:06 AM
foot2foot
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Default A quick thanks to all


"Lisa Horton" wrote in message
...
.. All the info is blending into a blur of "hands
forward, weight centered, stand up and do that

thing with your foot where you feel the edge biting
into the snow".

For a beginner, or semi newbie, or olympic racers for
nigh on 40 plus years, as far as fore/aft balance, as
forward as you can get is preferable. It frees up the
tails. There are times when you want to be centered,
but not yet. Get as forward as you can on the skis.
That way you won't fall backward.

As far as side to side balance, use a shoulder wide stance
and keep your body centered between the skis at lower
speeds. In this way you'll be crossed over either ski, as
your body must be on the left side of the skis to turn left,
and on the right side of the skis to turn right. .

At higher speeds, simply move only *the hips* toward the
inside of the turn, while mostly leaving the shoulders over
the skis.

Use knee angulation to bring the ski(s) up on edge.

Here you're using body position, weight distribution,
angulation and crossover.

Twist the whole leg(s) in the direction you want to go
if you so desire.


  #9  
Old April 27th 04, 03:21 AM
Jeff Davis
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Default A quick thanks to all

In article ,
Lisa Horton wrote:
where you feel the edge biting into the snow". Next week I'll have two
full days to try all the things I've learned and start to understand
them. No doubt returning with ever more questions


We're waiting with baited breath...
--
According to John Perry Barlow, "Jeff Davis is a truly gifted trouble-maker."

  #10  
Old April 27th 04, 03:23 AM
Jeff Davis
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Default A quick thanks to all

In article ,
klaus wrote:
Lisa Horton wrote:
Theory is all fine and well, but it won't keep your butt off the ground.


Hah! Nothing will. Get used to it.


The first thing Dolf taught us was that its OK to fall down. After 46
years, I'm really REALLY good at it.
--
According to John Perry Barlow, "Jeff Davis is a truly gifted trouble-maker."

 




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