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videos of my skating with poles (was Poles / No-poles Skating experiment)



 
 
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Old December 29th 03, 12:24 PM
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Default videos of my skating with poles (was Poles / No-poles Skating experiment)

I meant to ask, Ken, but forgot: my assumption was that the main supercomputer
in your mysterious post about Aalsgard a few weeks ago was his cerebellum,
and the four auxiliary computers were aspects of his nervous system
located in his four limbs??

Have you read Penrose's (the mathematician/physicist) books "The Emperor's
New Mind" and "Shadows of the Mind"?

Best, Peter




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  #2  
Old December 29th 03, 01:53 PM
Ken Roberts
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Default videos of my skating with poles (was Poles / No-poles Skating experiment)

Yes, the amazing supercomputer in my "Norwegian Future Skate project" post
was the cerebellum of Thomas Alsgaard.

And the auxiliary super-computers to drive it would include like the visual
2D processing sequence into quasi-3D and recognition, and that distorted
"somatic homunculus" in the brain that maps to the nerve sensors in the skin
and places. And also various centers forward around the cerebrum, where
some of the actions of the cerebellum are interpreted into concepts (often
mistakenly) -- and sometimes we try to introduce new concepts from the
cerebrum back to the cerebellum to execute (often differently than we
hoped).

My understanding from a few years back is that there's way more processing
power in the cerebellum than in the cerebrum -- because the task of
coordinating the physics of all those joints and sensors in full
three-dimensional geometry is computationally extremely complicated. The
"intelligent" capabilities of the cerebrum like logic and calculus proved
much easier for "artificial intelligence" to surpass than the sensory-motor
coordination of the average human 4-year-old.

From what little I've heard about the _other_ Norwegian Skate Project in the
1990s, it sounded like an attempt to use the _cerebrum_ to improve skating
technique. But ski skating with poles is the most complicated human
propulsive motion. Trying to find the optimal coordination for a mechanical
system that complex by using a computer with less processing power and
little design-specialization for biomechanical physics and little access to
critical input data and metrics -- is overall a bad bet.

Especially when I start suspecting that some of the cerebrums involved knew
less of basic physics than the average human cerebellum. Of course some of
the people involved with the New Skate project must really understand the
physics of reactive forces -- but I wouldn't have guessed that from anything
I've seen _written_ about that skating approach.

For that matter, I haven't yet found anything about indirect reactive forces
in _any_ American writing about ski skating. But I'd love to find some, so
please send me references.

Ken

P.S. I have not read Penrose beyond his introduction. He didn't seem to be
addressing the questions about consciousness that I find interesting.
___________________________
Peter Hoffman wrote
I meant to ask, Ken, but forgot: my assumption was that the main

supercomputer
in your mysterious post about Aalsgard a few weeks ago was his cerebellum,
and the four auxiliary computers were aspects of his nervous system
located in his four limbs??

Have you read Penrose's (the mathematician/physicist) books "The Emperor's
New Mind" and "Shadows of the Mind"?



 




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