A Snow and ski forum. SkiBanter

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » SkiBanter forum » Skiing Newsgroups » Alpine Skiing
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

question about 1st pair of skis



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old October 13th 04, 01:08 PM
Rut
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default question about 1st pair of skis

I'm trying to buy my first set of skis. I've been skiing for 2-3 years
and would consider myself "almost" intermidiate. I'm not a fast skier
and never go off groomed snow. Don't get into bumps/tricks. Just like
cruising down the mountain. I'm thinking I fit into the carving
wannabe mold but still want a ski that can make quick turns (Can
carving skis do that too?). I'm 47, 200lbs.

I've been looking at the K2 5500 and atomic c 9.18, c:8. I worry that
I might be looking at "too much" ski for my ability, while at the same
time not wanting to buy a ski that I will have to replace in 2 years.


I've tried demo skis but the ski shops never seem to give me anything
good. They don't rent out the atomics or k2's. In fact, twice they
have given me womens skis.

Any suggestions appreciated.

Rut
Ads
  #2  
Old October 13th 04, 02:38 PM
Walt
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Rut wrote:

I'm trying to buy my first set of skis. I've been skiing for 2-3 years
and would consider myself "almost" intermidiate. I'm not a fast skier
and never go off groomed snow. Don't get into bumps/tricks. Just like
cruising down the mountain. I'm thinking I fit into the carving
wannabe mold but still want a ski that can make quick turns (Can
carving skis do that too?). I'm 47, 200lbs.

I've been looking at the K2 5500 and atomic c 9.18, c:8. I worry that
I might be looking at "too much" ski for my ability, while at the same
time not wanting to buy a ski that I will have to replace in 2 years.

I've tried demo skis but the ski shops never seem to give me anything
good. They don't rent out the atomics or k2's. In fact, twice they
have given me womens skis.

Any suggestions appreciated.


Suggestion: Find a better place to demo. Demo skis should be top of
the line, not the mediocre intermediate noodles you find at the rental
desk. Are you sure you're going to the demo center and not just the
rental counter? Where are you located?

I think you're on the right track looking at the Atomic C9 or K2 5500 -
these are advanced/intermediate skis that you should be able to grow
into but won't grow out of in a season or so. Neither should be "too
much ski", although you may have to work a little bit harder than you're
used to.

Definitely try before you buy. A decent demo center should have several
models to choose from in every category (on-piste carver, all-mountain,
twin-tip, etc.) and let you change skis several times over the course of
the day.

oh, one more thing: get yourself a decent pair of good fitting boots
first.


--
//-Walt
//
// http://cagle.slate.msn.com/working/040514/matson.gif
  #3  
Old October 13th 04, 06:56 PM
Rut
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Thanks for the info. I ski mostly at Sugar Mtn, Banner Elk, NC. They
shops around the slopes are where I usually go. I know they have demo
days the 1st weekend in Dec. Of course they only have the newest stuff
then and I'm looking at last years stuff for a better buy. Already
have a good set of boots. Got them first thing.

When you say I might have to "work harder" at those skis I mentioned,
what do you mean? Is it because of the stiffness of the ski?

Rut

Walt wrote in message ...
Rut wrote:

I'm trying to buy my first set of skis. I've been skiing for 2-3 years
and would consider myself "almost" intermidiate. I'm not a fast skier
and never go off groomed snow. Don't get into bumps/tricks. Just like
cruising down the mountain. I'm thinking I fit into the carving
wannabe mold but still want a ski that can make quick turns (Can
carving skis do that too?). I'm 47, 200lbs.

I've been looking at the K2 5500 and atomic c 9.18, c:8. I worry that
I might be looking at "too much" ski for my ability, while at the same
time not wanting to buy a ski that I will have to replace in 2 years.

I've tried demo skis but the ski shops never seem to give me anything
good. They don't rent out the atomics or k2's. In fact, twice they
have given me womens skis.

Any suggestions appreciated.


Suggestion: Find a better place to demo. Demo skis should be top of
the line, not the mediocre intermediate noodles you find at the rental
desk. Are you sure you're going to the demo center and not just the
rental counter? Where are you located?

I think you're on the right track looking at the Atomic C9 or K2 5500 -
these are advanced/intermediate skis that you should be able to grow
into but won't grow out of in a season or so. Neither should be "too
much ski", although you may have to work a little bit harder than you're
used to.

Definitely try before you buy. A decent demo center should have several
models to choose from in every category (on-piste carver, all-mountain,
twin-tip, etc.) and let you change skis several times over the course of
the day.

oh, one more thing: get yourself a decent pair of good fitting boots
first.

  #4  
Old October 13th 04, 08:21 PM
Walt
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Rut wrote:

Thanks for the info. I ski mostly at Sugar Mtn, Banner Elk, NC. They
shops around the slopes are where I usually go. I know they have demo
days the 1st weekend in Dec. Of course they only have the newest stuff
then and I'm looking at last years stuff for a better buy. Already
have a good set of boots. Got them first thing.


Good job on the boots. Buying last year's model skis or used skis can
save you a lot of cash. I demo every year and file the data away for
future use. Plus, most models don't change that much from year to
year. It still sounds like you're hitting the regular rentals rather
than demo rentals. Demos are almost always this year model ski.
Sometimes they're called "high performance" rentals and include some of
last year's model.


When you say I might have to "work harder" at those skis I mentioned,
what do you mean? Is it because of the stiffness of the ski?


More precise movements, better technique, and possibly a bit more oomph
with the muscles. Stiffness is part of it, but there are other
intangibles that play a part as well.

A forgiving ski is, well, forgiving of mistakes. You can be lazy, get
in the backseat, and it'll still ski ok. A ski like the Atomic C9 is
less forgiving and requires a bit better technique than a rental noodle,
but it'll perform better if you have the chops. Some skis are very very
demanding (i.e. a race ski). Something in the C9 class is probably what
you're looking for.


--
//-Walt
//
// http://cagle.slate.msn.com/working/040514/matson.gif
  #5  
Old October 13th 04, 08:50 PM
lal_truckee
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Rut wrote:
Thanks for the info. I ski mostly at Sugar Mtn, Banner Elk, NC. They
shops around the slopes are where I usually go. I know they have demo
days the 1st weekend in Dec. Of course they only have the newest stuff
then and I'm looking at last years stuff for a better buy. Already
have a good set of boots. Got them first thing.


Hey guys - we got ourselves a top-poster - get a look at em before he
learns his way around...

Demo Days are good - particularly because they are free. But Walt is
talking about rental operations that rent high end skis. Many are tied
to a shop which will give you the rental price off a pair of skis bought
at the shop. Check some better shops. But many larger mountains have a
separate rental operation usually labeled "Perfomance Rentals" or
sometimes just "Demo Rentals" that rent high performance skis. At
mountain demo rentals are good because you can usually come in several
times a day and trade skis, so you can try lots of models.


When you say I might have to "work harder" at those skis I mentioned,
what do you mean? Is it because of the stiffness of the ski?


The primary difference between intermediate skis and performance skis is
intermediate skis are designed NOT to respond immediately and precisely
to skier iniput - that's called "forgiving" in the ads. Performance skis
are responsive - you screw up, the ski responds as if you meant it, and
you've crashed. A second characteristic is energy - energy in (from the
skier) is returned by the ski - makes linked dynamic turns easier if you
do it right; can throw you if you screw up. Getting the energy into the
ski is where Walt's "work harder" comes from.


Rut

Walt wrote in message ...


CLIP

I think you're on the right track looking at the Atomic C9 or K2 5500 -
these are advanced/intermediate skis that you should be able to grow
into but won't grow out of in a season or so. Neither should be "too
much ski", although you may have to work a little bit harder than you're
used to.

Definitely try before you buy. A decent demo center should have several
models to choose from in every category (on-piste carver, all-mountain,
twin-tip, etc.) and let you change skis several times over the course of
the day.

oh, one more thing: get yourself a decent pair of good fitting boots
first.


I gather he didn't see this comment! It is the most significant thing!
Good, solid, well-fitted boots FIRST!! All else is wasted effort without
Good Boots. BTW Good Boots does not equal Expensive Boots.
  #7  
Old October 14th 04, 08:54 AM
peter.creagh
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Hi

I purchased a pair of race GS skis as an intermediate skier because I had a
gut feeling that I would have fewer
falls. While initially I had more falls due to the fact I had
let my skiing become slack on my old skis, as soon as I
applied some aggression I had no problem and was able
to become less aggressive the more I got to know the skis.
They will let you know if you get too slack on them but
I like to think of that characteristic as being like having a
ski instructor with you everyday.
Another ski worth considering is a twin tip. If you enjoy
all terrain skiing these may be a better buy but get them
shorter than normal due to the fact they are wider. They
are cheaper than race skis and you may find them easier.

Good luck

Peter
"Joel" wrote in message
...
On 13 Oct 2004 06:08:59 -0700, (Rut) wrote:

I'm not a fast skier

When you get better skis, and get a little better, you will be a
faster skier. And you'll love it! So make sure you get something
that'll handle that speed with your weight. I'm not up to date on the
newest cruisers, as I look for powder and tree skis now, so I can't
give you specifics. But you sound like me in my third year. So don't
underestimate yourself. The same ski that will turn well at 12MPH will
be a noodler at 30+





.................................................. ..............
Posted via TITANnews - Uncensored Newsgroups Access
at
http://www.TitanNews.com
-=Every Newsgroup - Anonymous, UNCENSORED, BROADBAND Downloads=-



  #8  
Old October 14th 04, 11:35 AM
Rut
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Thanks again for the info. (Not sure what a top-poster is but it sound
negative)?

I'm aware of the type of performance demo rentals you refer to. The
last pair I rented were Soloman verse 8. They skiied extremely well.
Come to find out they were the women's model. None of these shops had
the k2 5500 or atomic c's. I asked at 3 different rental shops! One
thing I've tried to do is compare that skis' dimensions with those
that I'm looking at in hopes of finding a similar performing ski. I
know stiffness is something you don't get from the tech data, and I'm
not sure what difference a couple of mm in tip/waist width makes
either (so many questions).

Also, perhaps you can tell me what the pro/cons are of ski tails being
rounded or squared make to performance? I'm sure it has something to
do with how the tail whips around but I'm not even sure if I've
experienced that.

As far as the "energy you put in is what you get back" makes it sound
like I will have to actually work to enjoy skiing these particular
models and, perhaps, have better than average technical skill. I'm not
sure I have the "correct" technical skills nor do I want to have to
work very hard to enjoy skiing (it's not an obsession, just one sport
I can enjoy with my daughter). Makes me think I may need to back down
a notch in model (maybe a C:8 instead of c:9?).

Thanks again. I've gotten better advise here than I have at any ski
shop I've been to. Most of them seem to be staffed with local college
kids and I question their knowledge level.

Rut


Joel wrote in message . ..
On 13 Oct 2004 06:08:59 -0700, (Rut) wrote:

I'm not a fast skier

When you get better skis, and get a little better, you will be a
faster skier. And you'll love it! So make sure you get something
that'll handle that speed with your weight. I'm not up to date on the
newest cruisers, as I look for powder and tree skis now, so I can't
give you specifics. But you sound like me in my third year. So don't
underestimate yourself. The same ski that will turn well at 12MPH will
be a noodler at 30+





.................................................. ..............
Posted via TITANnews - Uncensored Newsgroups Access
at
http://www.TitanNews.com
-=Every Newsgroup - Anonymous, UNCENSORED, BROADBAND Downloads=-

  #9  
Old October 14th 04, 12:19 PM
BrritSki
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Rut wrote:

Thanks again for the info. (Not sure what a top-poster is but it sound
negative)?

It's someone who posts their replies at the top of a message. Most
people find it very irritating, me included. This only applies to
usenet, not to emails where I either top post or interweave my replies
as I am doing here. You can do your own research into the netiquette of
it, but I'll just mention this:
A. Top posters
Q. What is thge most annoying thing about usenet


Also, perhaps you can tell me what the pro/cons are of ski tails being
rounded or squared make to performance? I'm sure it has something to
do with how the tail whips around but I'm not even sure if I've
experienced that.

No I don't think so, even "square" skis have some rounding at the corner
of the flat rear-edge and even the top racers would not be engaging that
part of the tail-edge.
It's useful for tricksters who like to ski backwards - see my post a day
or 2 ago about this.

  #10  
Old October 14th 04, 12:25 PM
foot2foot
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Rut" wrote in message
om...
Thanks again for the info. (Not sure what a top-poster is but it sound
negative)?


Certain anal retentive, socially impotent, controlling types on
usenet and the weak personalitied people that follow them,
insist that you put your reply to a post underneath the text you're
replying to.

Although I usually bottom post, at times I don't. There's a time
and place for everything.


 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Used Ski Prices Zachary Caldwell Nordic Skiing 12 July 1st 04 12:36 AM
Near fatal ski incident Me Nordic Skiing 22 February 27th 04 02:47 PM
Newbie question rock skis Bob Nordic Skiing 7 January 29th 04 04:18 AM
Bit off-topic question about ski's Marinus European Ski Resorts 28 November 27th 03 01:36 PM
Suggestions for one pair of all mountain skis. HELP! Gabriel Kristal Alpine Skiing 16 November 7th 03 07:28 PM


All times are GMT. The time now is 04:21 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2024, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2024 SkiBanter.
The comments are property of their posters.