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Striding mo' betta?



 
 
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  #1  
Old January 15th 04, 06:07 AM
Bill Kraus
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Posts: n/a
Default Striding mo' betta?

I feel quite strongly that perfecting striding - stuff like full weight
transfer, dynamic body position, fully committed kick/double pole - makes

a
huge improvement in skating too. There's NOTHING like tuning in on good
classic technique on excellent gear. It's so relaxing and at the same

time
challenging. I skate a lot too (truth be told, probably more hours than
striding), but would give that up before striding!


It's funny that you say that - I'm nowhere nears the level of most of the
folks on this newsgroup, but I've been thinking the same thing. I first took
up nordic skiing four years ago - did all the local citizen races (which are
almost all skating), and only ocassionally took out the classic gear. Didn't
help that classic technique aggravates an old ankle injury, and that here in
Tahoe, it always seems to be icy, klister conditions.

Then last year in late January I had a good Norwegian friend convince me to
fly over and do the Birkebeinerennet (he's an awesome classic skier whose
gotten the 'mark' the last seven times he's done the race). Well, I finished
at the back of my age class, but fell in love with classic skiing. I find it
technically more difficult than skating, and actually enjoy the challenge of
trying to hit the kick wax. I now do classic technique in many of the
free-style races I participate in just because I find it more enjoyable (and
it's not like I'm competitive anyway). Funny thing is, I also noticed that
since I've been doing more classic, it seems to help my balance while
skating. Skating is still alot of fun, especially on the downhills with the
better ankle support and shorter skis, but to me, there's nothing like
finding your stride (pun intended) and making that perfect kick.

b


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  #2  
Old January 15th 04, 10:26 PM
Griss
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Posts: n/a
Default Striding mo' betta?

I see so many people who only skate ski nowadays and feel sorry for them (I
did NOT say I look down my nose at them as lesser skiers!). I also know a
lot of decent, serious skiers who have top shelf skating gear but quite a
bit lesser quality, and/or far older striding gear. It's pretty common to
see 10 year old, lower quality striding gear and logs for poles on guys who
have world class skating gear, including the $250 poles and newest boots.

I feel quite strongly that perfecting striding - stuff like full weight
transfer, dynamic body position, fully committed kick/double pole - makes a
huge improvement in skating too. There's NOTHING like tuning in on good
classic technique on excellent gear. It's so relaxing and at the same time
challenging. I skate a lot too (truth be told, probably more hours than
striding), but would give that up before striding!

Why my rant? I just was given a wonderful Christmas gift - top shelf
classical gear (Atomic RC11 skis, Yoko/Toko poles, Salomon carbon boots -
which are waaaay too expensive, but actually fit and felt best, so what the
hey; what's $100 over 100s of hours of fun?). There is no exaggeration that
I probably would have never bought it for myself. I spend as much as I can
afford on my kids' stuff, but generally search for make-do stuff used or on
sale for myself. My old gear was actually OK (except for the log poles).
But now, my gear for my favorite technique is on par with my skating gear
.... and I am just IN LOVE with it! It has caused me to stride much more
than before. I haven't skated in a month.

Something interesting I've really noticed since getting this stuff: I have
never felt self conscious being a semi-hack with top shelf skating gear -
because there's a lot my peers who have the same. But there's far fewer, if
any, peers of mine who have similar top shelf classical gear. Those Carbon
boots really stand out in a crowd and I certainly don't "walk the walk"! I
want to emphasize that anyone/everyone who loves an active sport really
should buy the best gear they can afford, whether or not they're "worthy" -
it's always more fun, imho. This is absolutely NOT to say you can't have
fun, be fit or even race with the other gear, just that, if you can afford
it, the good stuff is a lot of fun.

I would NEVER say "you're not a real skier unless you love striding more
than skating", but I'm sure thinking it.

8-)

Grissy


  #3  
Old January 16th 04, 04:26 AM
Matt L.
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Posts: n/a
Default Striding mo' betta?

I have not classic skied since high school, and I have only become a
better skate skier because of it. I'm sure there are many people how don't
share my views, but skate skiing only seems to work the best for me. If I
had upwards of 100 days of on snow skiing a year I might consider picking up
classic skiing again, but until that time (may never happen again the way
winters are going know) I'll skick to what I enjoy the most.

Matt Liebsch
UofM skier



"Griss" wrote in message
...
I see so many people who only skate ski nowadays and feel sorry for them

(I
did NOT say I look down my nose at them as lesser skiers!). I also know a
lot of decent, serious skiers who have top shelf skating gear but quite a
bit lesser quality, and/or far older striding gear. It's pretty common to
see 10 year old, lower quality striding gear and logs for poles on guys

who
have world class skating gear, including the $250 poles and newest boots.

I feel quite strongly that perfecting striding - stuff like full weight
transfer, dynamic body position, fully committed kick/double pole - makes

a
huge improvement in skating too. There's NOTHING like tuning in on good
classic technique on excellent gear. It's so relaxing and at the same

time
challenging. I skate a lot too (truth be told, probably more hours than
striding), but would give that up before striding!

Why my rant? I just was given a wonderful Christmas gift - top shelf
classical gear (Atomic RC11 skis, Yoko/Toko poles, Salomon carbon boots -
which are waaaay too expensive, but actually fit and felt best, so what

the
hey; what's $100 over 100s of hours of fun?). There is no exaggeration

that
I probably would have never bought it for myself. I spend as much as I

can
afford on my kids' stuff, but generally search for make-do stuff used or

on
sale for myself. My old gear was actually OK (except for the log poles).
But now, my gear for my favorite technique is on par with my skating gear
... and I am just IN LOVE with it! It has caused me to stride much more
than before. I haven't skated in a month.

Something interesting I've really noticed since getting this stuff: I

have
never felt self conscious being a semi-hack with top shelf skating gear -
because there's a lot my peers who have the same. But there's far fewer,

if
any, peers of mine who have similar top shelf classical gear. Those

Carbon
boots really stand out in a crowd and I certainly don't "walk the walk"!

I
want to emphasize that anyone/everyone who loves an active sport really
should buy the best gear they can afford, whether or not they're

"worthy" -
it's always more fun, imho. This is absolutely NOT to say you can't have
fun, be fit or even race with the other gear, just that, if you can afford
it, the good stuff is a lot of fun.

I would NEVER say "you're not a real skier unless you love striding more
than skating", but I'm sure thinking it.

8-)

Grissy




  #4  
Old January 16th 04, 08:19 PM
Dell Todd
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Striding mo' betta?

I just love classic!! I am a classic specialist, and I must admit
that I have only skated 7 times so far, twice in March of '03 and four
times this year including two races a 7K & 15K . I have new boots and
bindings but I use pair of older skis. I haven't been able to stride
much this year because of snow cover and conditions, it has been thin
and icey until just recently. Therefore, I have only strided three
times and one of those was a 12K classic race. What I love about
classic is that you can just get rockin in a groove. There are fewer
things to think about I feel, in regards to technique and power. In a
race your concentration can be on a fewer things that can really make
a big difference in speed, and it can be a lot more fluid. It may be
that I am new to skating but I feel there are so many things to
concentrate on, V1, V2, openfield, when and how and don't get your
pole in the wrong place or WHAM! It is so much to think about!
Especially maintaining momentum on the uphills. I know my power is
pretty weak in that department but I feel I am so much more powerful
in classic going uphills than skating uphills. It is also lots of fun
ripping downhills in the classic tracks, its like you are on rails
what a blast!! The few times I have skated there have been no tracks
to the side, so even for an experienced downhiller ripping down on
skaters is a little scary!

I am not sure why it seems to me that so many more people skate than
classic. I find it sad too, classic is where you start out as a kid
and should be something that you can do until your are 90+.

Ski for Life! Amy Todd

"Bill Kraus" wrote in message om...
I feel quite strongly that perfecting striding - stuff like full weight
transfer, dynamic body position, fully committed kick/double pole - makes

a
huge improvement in skating too. There's NOTHING like tuning in on good
classic technique on excellent gear. It's so relaxing and at the same

time
challenging. I skate a lot too (truth be told, probably more hours than
striding), but would give that up before striding!


It's funny that you say that - I'm nowhere nears the level of most of the
folks on this newsgroup, but I've been thinking the same thing. I first took
up nordic skiing four years ago - did all the local citizen races (which are
almost all skating), and only ocassionally took out the classic gear. Didn't
help that classic technique aggravates an old ankle injury, and that here in
Tahoe, it always seems to be icy, klister conditions.

Then last year in late January I had a good Norwegian friend convince me to
fly over and do the Birkebeinerennet (he's an awesome classic skier whose
gotten the 'mark' the last seven times he's done the race). Well, I finished
at the back of my age class, but fell in love with classic skiing. I find it
technically more difficult than skating, and actually enjoy the challenge of
trying to hit the kick wax. I now do classic technique in many of the
free-style races I participate in just because I find it more enjoyable (and
it's not like I'm competitive anyway). Funny thing is, I also noticed that
since I've been doing more classic, it seems to help my balance while
skating. Skating is still alot of fun, especially on the downhills with the
better ankle support and shorter skis, but to me, there's nothing like
finding your stride (pun intended) and making that perfect kick.

b

  #5  
Old January 17th 04, 03:05 PM
Jeff Potter
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Striding mo' betta?

Dell [AMY!] Todd wrote:

[ ] I haven't been able to stride
much this year because of snow cover and conditions, it has been thin
and icey until just recently.


I used to gripe about classic in bad tracks until I got used to rollerskiing classic. Now I don't need tracks at all. It's a
nice liberation. Also in races, the tracks are wiped out lots of times. Good to not need them! It took me a dozen frustrating
outings on classical rollerskis to learn to easily keep em going straight then my need for tracks went away in all
conditions. Also, and here's a biggie: get some stiff wide touring skis. With those plus the new boots and bindings you can
easily ski in local training conditions. I typically only use my race classics in a race. Around town our ungroomed
conditions are never good enough for race skis.

[ ] There are fewer
things to think about I feel, in regards to technique and power. In a
race your concentration can be on a fewer things that can really make
a big difference in speed, and it can be a lot more fluid.


Classic demands as much as we can give! I find it to be pretty subtle. But I find it all that way.

It is also lots of fun
ripping downhills in the classic tracks, its like you are on rails
what a blast!! The few times I have skated there have been no tracks
to the side, so even for an experienced downhiller ripping down on
skaters is a little scary!


But with no tracks, classic downhill is scarier than skate downhill. The stiff short skis and big boots help downhilling in
some cases. Classic downhilling is often "hold onto those flimsy noodles for dear life!" The low boots sometimes feel less
secure.

I am not sure why it seems to me that so many more people skate than
classic. I find it sad too, classic is where you start out as a kid
and should be something that you can do until your are 90+.


I recall Anikin saying that we love skiing because of the glide and that's why kids love it, too. Anything that gives the
most and the easiest glide, they like the most. So he found they liked skating better. I suppose classic relates to runners
and skating to skaters. Maybe lots of kids are equally good at both. To get a lot of glide in classic there's a definite 100%
stop/start aspect to each ski cycle. Timing that can be tricky. Balance, too. With skating it's just waddling, rocking, to
give the glide to a beginner.

I like classic better, too, but find that V2 is a wonderful challenge and beautiful in some ways. I dislike some aspects of
skating because they're LOPSIDED and involve intentional passganging---poling and kicking on the same side!

--

Jeff Potter
****
*Out Your Backdoor * http://www.outyourbackdoor.com
publisher of outdoor/indoor do-it-yourself culture...
...offering "small world" views on bikes, bows, books, movies...
...rare books on ski, bike, boat culture, plus a Gulf Coast thriller
about smalltown smuggling ... radical novels coming up!
...original downloadable music ... and articles galore!
plus national travel forums! HOLY SMOKES! 800-763-6923


  #6  
Old January 17th 04, 07:59 PM
Griss
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Posts: n/a
Default Striding mo' betta?

"Jeff Potter" wrote in message
.. .
Dell [AMY!] Todd wrote:

[ ] I haven't been able to stride
much this year because of snow cover and conditions, it has been thin
and icey until just recently.


I used to gripe about classic in bad tracks until I got used to

rollerskiing classic. Now I don't need tracks at all. It's a
nice liberation. Also in races, the tracks are wiped out lots of times.

Good to not need them! It took me a dozen frustrating
outings on classical rollerskis to learn to easily keep em going straight

then my need for tracks went away in all
conditions. Also, and here's a biggie: get some stiff wide touring skis.

With those plus the new boots and bindings you can
easily ski in local training conditions. I typically only use my race

classics in a race. Around town our ungroomed
conditions are never good enough for race skis.


The past few years, I've also started enjoying striding a lot more than
skating when it starts getting hard/icy conditions.. I get tired of
skating in those conditions. It seems hard on my feet and body in general.
Once you get over the klister hangup (ski with some Norwegians, that'll do
it), it's much more fun for me to stride when it gets icy. Klister rooolz.

[ ] There are fewer
things to think about I feel, in regards to technique and power. In a
race your concentration can be on a fewer things that can really make
a big difference in speed, and it can be a lot more fluid.


Classic demands as much as we can give! I find it to be pretty subtle. But

I find it all that way.

Same here. Being a slow skier, I am still a technique junky, both styles.

It is also lots of fun
ripping downhills in the classic tracks, its like you are on rails
what a blast!! The few times I have skated there have been no tracks
to the side, so even for an experienced downhiller ripping down on
skaters is a little scary!


But with no tracks, classic downhill is scarier than skate downhill. The

stiff short skis and big boots help downhilling in
some cases. Classic downhilling is often "hold onto those flimsy noodles

for dear life!" The low boots sometimes feel less
secure.


Not necessarily true. I have enjoyed a 1000% improvement in the performance
in classic-ing downhill (e.g. skate and other turning at speed on classic
gear) with my new gear (new top shelf gear replaced 10+ y.old mid-shelf
gear). Disclaimer: I'm no elite skier, this is all *relative* to my own
previous performance! Both the skis and the boots made a large difference in
and of themselves - The new boots do much better with the old skis and the
new skis do much better with the old boots. Together, I feel almost as sure
footed downhill as I do on my skating gear. This is one of the reasons I
think a non-elite skier can really benefit from and enjoy elite-level gear,
especially if you're a reformed downhiller (free-heel and alpine) like me.
I don't know if Atomic skis are especially designed for downhill
performance, but they seem to handle a lot better than the old Madshus. The
Carbon boots may or may not be better than other top line boots (I doubt
it), but they work extremely well for this.

I am not sure why it seems to me that so many more people skate than
classic. I find it sad too, classic is where you start out as a kid
and should be something that you can do until your are 90+.


I recall Anikin saying that we love skiing because of the glide and that's

why kids love it, too. Anything that gives the
most and the easiest glide, they like the most. So he found they liked

skating better. I suppose classic relates to runners
and skating to skaters. Maybe lots of kids are equally good at both. To

get a lot of glide in classic there's a definite 100%
stop/start aspect to each ski cycle. Timing that can be tricky. Balance,

too. With skating it's just waddling, rocking, to
give the glide to a beginner.


I think this is true. My teenage kids, both who I think most would say have
pretty nice classic technique, ALWAYS default to skating - even when it's
cold and striding would be more fun (imo, of course - they don't agree) .
Aside from what you've said above, it seems to me that those who were full
grown and skiing by or before the late 70s early 80s before skating took off
still enjoy striding quite a bit more than others. So, it's sort of a
geezer thing as well, regardless of whether you're a runner (I'm not).

I like classic better, too, but find that V2 is a wonderful challenge and

beautiful in some ways. I dislike some aspects of
skating because they're LOPSIDED and involve intentional

passganging---poling and kicking on the same side!

I really enjoy V2 also. Once you get it, it can be very relaxing. I enjoy
skating and seem to relax quite a bit more as I get fit enough to V2 more
stuff than when I'm not fit and have to V1 more. duh.

Grissy


 




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